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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

kldibel, v.r.s.(persons) called together or assembled (typically for the purpose of a meeting or sermon).
kldibel a klideb; cheldull; chelludel.
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klekosek, v.r.s.cut; sliced; (pig) castrated; flattered.
klekosek a klekodek; selekosek
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ulekang, v.r.s.fed; made to eat.
ulekang a mla mokang; mla omengur; smecher a ulekang; mekelii, omekang er tir; okelel.
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ulekellakl, v.r.s.held on slant or at angle.
ulekellak a dkois; turekorek, tingoi a ochil a ulekellak a omerolel; olekang a ulekellak.
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ulterau, v.r.s.sold; given away.
ulterau a mla moterau; mla mochar; mla oterau a chutem, oterur a mesei; oterul a klolekled e kid a chelbed.
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urralm, v.r.s.(clothes) rinsed.
urralm a mla muralm; mla mralm a selokel; urelmel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

berekedall, v.a.s.is to be pasted or glued onto; is to be leaned against.
berekedall a kirel el obereked. mereked a babier, merekedii, omereked er ngii.
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bredechall, v.a.s.is to be buttoned or inlaid.
bredechall a kirel el obrodech, merdechii, mrodech, kirel el murodech a bail.
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dbokel, v.a.s.is to be kicked (away) or swept away or fended off.
dbokel a kirel el medibek; dibekii a bduu, duibek, melibek a bduu el olab a uach, dbekel.
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ksomel, v.a.s.is to be chopped with clam-shell ax.
ksomel a kirel el mekisem; mecheduib, mengisem er ngii; ksemel.
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kuekuall, v.a.s.is to be carried/cradled.
kuekuall a kirel el mekuoku; kiukuii a ngalek, kiuoku a babirengel, kiukuel.
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riomel, v.a.s.is to be collected or gathered and transported.
riomel a kirel el meriim; kloleklel a riomel, riemii, reuiim; ngmai el rokui el otobed; riemel.
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temikel, v.a.s.is to be shaved or scraped.
temikel a kirel el mengai; kirel el metamk; tomkii; tuamk a chesemel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
uidfruit that has fallen off the tree on its own.udall(fishnet) is to be pulled in.
chiukl(singing) voice.cheiukl(person) having a good singing voice.
mekealdhot water; hot drink (esp., coffee).mekeald warm; hot.
singodor of sperm.besingsmell of sperm; smell unclean (esp., used in insults referring to women).
bausmell; odor; scent.bekebausmell of vagina.
bangikoibutterfly; moth.bangikoibutterfly; moth.
bikodelhives or rash from allergies; allergic reaction affecting the skin.bikodelbroken out in hives.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
bekesbesebek a renguleasily worried; worrisome.
merusech a rengulrepentant.
medengelii a rengulregain consciousness (after a faint or stroke); (person) self-confident or self-assured; (person) knowing his abilities or capacities.
suebek a rengulworried; anxious.
olsiich er a rengultake pleasure in someone else's pain, difficulties, problems, etc.
mengeokl er a rengulburden; bother; cause concern; weigh on.
mechese a rengulbecoming surprised.

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