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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blachel, v.r.s.(firewood) split.
blachel a blechall; telutiud el mekekeriei, mla obachel, mechelii, machel a idungel.
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blitokl, v.r.s.turned around or inside out or upside down; distorted.
blitokl a mla obitokl; miteklii, blult, mitokl, bliteklel.
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delilech, v.r.s.dipped (and removed from water).
delilech a mla medilech; ngar er a ralm; dellochel, selokel a delilech , dilechii, dmilech, delechel a selokel.
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rrebek, v.r.s.groped at.
rrebek a mla merebek; mla robekii a ochab el oba biskang.
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telbotb, v.r.s.(long object) divided or split into small pieces, strips.
telbotb a mla metbotb; tibetbii a olukl, melbotb a besebes; tibotb, tbetbel.
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ules, v.r.s.seen; looked at.
ules a mla moues; mechuiu; babier er a chutem a ules; omes, osengel.
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ulluut, v.r.s.returned; sent back.
ulluut a mla moluut; mla mengader; udoud a ulluut, olutii, oluut, olutel a udoud.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chesechaol, v.a.s.are to be threaded/strung; always wandering from house to house.
chesechaol a chad el soal el mengesuch; merael a blai, di omais el diak el ultebechel.
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chetechetioll, v.a.s.is to be wounded.
chetechetioll a kirel el mechetechat; mengetechat er ngii, mekull, diak chetechetioll a chad me a charem.
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debedebokel, v.a.s.is to be thought about or remembered.
debedebokel a kirel el mudasu, kirel el medebedebek a meldung el tekoi; dobedebekii, dobedebek a urreor el kirel a klengeasek.
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debekill, v.a.s.is to be cursed.
debekill a kirel el medebeakl; melebeakl er ngii; kmal mekull el diak el debekill a chad, rechad.
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denguoll, v.a.s.is to be ridiculed (usually for incest).
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kelidel, v.a.s.is to be warmed or heated up.
kelidel a beot el mo mekeald; soal el mekeald; blai el smengt kelidel.
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tbaol, v.a.s.is to be spat on.
tbaol a kirel el metub; tub, tbal, tubar, ng diak el tbaol a smengt.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

chelechedsmall sea crab.chelechedhusked.
bukcorner; angle; joint; node.bkebkuulhaving many nodes; rough-edged; (shin of leg) have bumpy surface.
lusechluck.melusechalways lucky.
kimtype of large clam; female genitals.bekekimsmell of clams (after cleaning or cooking clams).
tedobech(one) half.tedobechhalf-filled; crazy; irrational.
berechsmell of raw fish.bekeberechsmell of the sea or raw fish.
techiirhandnet with handle; cloth or screen for pressing coconut milk; sheath at base of coconut frond (used for pressing coconut milk).mekudem a techerel(person who) understands or catches everything.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

checherd a rengulimpatient; fed up with.
melai er a rengulpersuade.
melatk a rengulconsider someone's feelings.
techetech a rengulstubborn; obsessed; determined.
melemed a rengulcool down one's anger.
ongemengemek a rengulongemengemek
derengulalso, used a as friendly expression of envy.

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