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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bliochel, v.r.s.sifted; filtered; pure; unadulterated; one of specific kind.
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klabs, v.r.s.hung with rope; etc.; defeated (in hanahuda = card game).
klabs a mla mekabs; tuu a klebikl, kebsel.
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klad, v.r.s.(sea cucumber) rolled/rubbed in ashes (to remove bad-tasting outer membrane).
klad er a chutem; a di dechudech el ta el chad. klad a mla mekad; kodir, kmad, mengad a cheremrum el mlai a mekoll er ngii; kedil.
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seledem, v.r.s.propositioned; proposed.
seledem a mla mesedem; te seledem er a omenged; sodemii er a klsau; kesedem; sedemel.
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teliualech, v.r.s.thrown at with a stick.
teliualech a mla metiualech; oba tiualech el meliualech; iedel a teliualech; tiulechii a meradel; tiulechel.
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ulekbat, v.r.s.(something) hidden or hard to find.
ulekbat a meringel el osiik; bulis a omekbat er a olsiseb mekngit el kar er a Belau; ulekbat er a milosii a president; mla mukbat.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

berekedall, v.a.s.is to be pasted or glued onto; is to be leaned against.
berekedall a kirel el obereked. mereked a babier, merekedii, omereked er ngii.
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dengechel, v.a.s.is to be set aside, recognized, distinguished or to be mounded.
dengechel a kirel el medangch; omuut a chutem er a uchul a iedel; dongchii a tuu er a chutem.
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kikiull, v.a.s.(distance or course) is to be swum.
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odiderekill, v.a.s.is to be loaded into (boat, etc.).
odiderekill a kirel el modiderekl; oltak; olengasech; odiderekl er a ert, odidereklii; odidereklel.
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orecherechall, v.a.s.is to be sunk.
orecherechall a kirel el morechorech; locha er a chelsel a daob; orechorech a mechut el diall; orecherechel.
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redekekill, v.a.s.(distance) is to be jumped.
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tongekill, v.a.s.is to be put or thrown up high.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
H.O.(abbrev.) Babeldaob (used pejoratively).H.O.(abbrev.) Babeldaob (used pejoratively).
kurstwitching (nervous disorder) .kurstwitching (nervous disorder) .
diulareng(someone's) happiness/joy.dmeuhappy; glad; joyful; appreciative.
olechutellarge bamboo raftolechutel(boat, person) slow-moving
kurstwitching (nervous disorder) .kurstwitching.
oreomelforest; woods.chereomel forested; covered with vegetation.
iudoraiburent-a-car; U-drive car.iudoraibu (woman) loose or fast.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
diak lodengelii a rengul(person) unaware of his limitations or overestimates his abilities or overextends himself with committments.
orrechorech a rengulextremely angry; wild with anger.
ngar er a eou a rengul(person is) humble/respectful.
olseked er a rengulstick to something (without giving up); be firm.
orreked er a rengulrestrain or control (oneself) (esp., from showing anger).
bedis a rengulinconsiderate.
telecherakl a rengulstubborn; obsessed; determined.

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