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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blkuuk, v.r.s.puffed up.
blkuuk a mla obkuuk; blsuus, seleches er a eolt, mkukii, omkuuk a blauang, bkukel.
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cheliseksikt, v.r.s.tangled up; involved; confused; ambiguous.
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chelsiau, v.r.s.assisted by contribution of food or labor.
chelsiau a mla mechesiau; chosiur, chosiau, Ngaramecherocher a chelsiau.
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selenges, v.r.s.(coconut tree) tapped for sap.
selenges a mla mesenges; ilaot a selenges; songesengii; songes, sengesengel.
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ulengill, v.r.s.knocked down or off.
ulengill a mla mongill; ulengill el orebet; olengill, ongill a iedel.
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ulngamk, v.r.s.set right or straight.
ulngamk a mla mungamk; mla locha ungamk er ngii; ulngamk a omekedecheraol, ungemkel a rael.
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urriik, v.r.s.chased out; expelled; gotten rid of.
urriik a mla moriik; modik; orikii a bilis, oriik a katuu, orikel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bechengall, v.a.s.is to be stepped on and crushed.
bechengall a kirel el meoch, omoch er ngii; mechengii, delul el meduu a ochengall.bechengel
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beksall, v.a.s.(spearhead) is to be pounded and flattened.
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keradel, v.a.s.is to be nibbled, munched or bitten.
keradel a kirel el mekard; mekiok, mengiok, kordii, bobai a keradel er a beab me a kiuid, kmard, kerdel a bobai.
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kilungall, v.a.s.is to be enlarged or increased in size.
kilungall a kirel el mo klou; osarech a rengmiu; menglou, mo kiei a rengmiu; rengud a rechad a kilungall, kilungii a rengum, mo diak el sebek a rengum; kilungel a reng.
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kudall, v.a.s.is to be dammed or delayed.
kudall a kirel el mekaud; melecha kaud, koudii a ralm, kmaud a bong, kudel.
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ochechall, v.a.s.is to be asked for persistently.
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tiuall, v.a.s.is to be rubbed or smoothed over or petted.
tiuall a kirel el metaiu; melaiu er ngii; toiuii a chimal; tmaiu a bedengel; tiuel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
bekngiukmold; (food) moldy/mildewed.bekngiuk(food) moldy/mildewed.
chemanglarge sea or mangrove crab; Samoan crab.bekechemangsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs).
chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).chermallcheromel
rekungland crab.bekerekungsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs, etc.).
rubakelder; old man; chief; foreign man; boyfriend; husband.rubakhaving the qualities of an old man.
H.O.(abbrev.) Babeldaob (used pejoratively).H.O.unexperienced in Western ways; ignorant of modern conveniences.
chemarsleak (in something like a boat or a bucket).chemars(boat, bucket, etc.) leaky; leaking.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
ngelem a rengulsmart; clever; having a retentive memory.
oltak er a renguldeceive oneself about being someone's sweetheart.
obais a rengulget fed up with; become unable to cope with.
melemalt a rengulfair; just; understanding; good-hearted.
tuobed a rengulone's real feelings come out.
ouralmesils a rengulweak-willed.
meduch a rengulhard-working; conscientious; strong-willed; persevering.

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