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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blsebosech, v.r.s.continually contradicted/opposed.
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cheleched, v.r.s.husked.
cheleched a chelechidel; lius el mla mecheched; chechedel.
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cherroakl, v.r.s.(ankle) twisted or sprained.
cherroakl a mla mocheroakl; ulechoid a ulengeruaol er a ochil, ulecheroakl.
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kerroker, v.r.s.(food) removed from pot completely.
kerroker a mla mekeroker; mla mengai el rokui; bachachau, korekerii a olekang, koroker, kerekerel.
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kladikm, v.r.s.right-handed; graceful (esp., in dance).
kladikm a meduch e klebokel; ungil el meloik e oungelakel, kladikm er a tekoi me a cheldecheduch.
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ulalk, v.r.s.dyed purple; purple color/dye; pandanus dyed purple.
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uldoseb, v.r.s.relieved from pain, overwork, etc..
uldoseb a mla modoseb; diak le charm a bedengel me a rengul; uldoseb e le chedam me a chedil a ulurreor el kirir; mla suobel; mla imiit er ringel; odesebel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

dechall, v.a.s.(trap) is to be set.
dechall a kirel el medachel; melachel er a bub, dochelii a bedikl, dmachel, dechelel.
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kimekmall, v.a.s.(string, cord, etc.) is to be bitten and broken.
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okebesall, v.a.s.is to be let to hang down.
okebesall a kirel el mokabes; chetakl a okebesall, okebesii, okabes a chetakl, okebesel.
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otechedall, v.a.s.is to be made to give up.
otechedall a kirel el motoched; otechedii, oltoched er ngii er a meringel el tekoi; rullii el tmoched, diak el ungil el otechedall a chad.
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rengsall, v.a.s.(hair) is to be pomaded.
rengsall a kirel merenguus; mekedelial el chui a rengsall, runguus, rengsel.
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ririuul, v.a.s.is to be shaken.
ririuul a kirel el meririau; berikd el iedel a ririuul; ririur me ng ruebet a rdechel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
maiscorn.maiscorn.
besokelringworm.besokelinfected with ringworm.
semumtrochus.semum having deformed fingers or toes.
bisechwild taro (makes mouth itchy).bisechfish with black and yellow stripes (makes mouth itchy).
bekngiukmold; (food) moldy/mildewed.bekngiuk(food) moldy/mildewed.
chaisnews.merael a chiselwell-known; famous; infamous; (person) popular. (news) spreading quickly.
chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
meringel a rengulfeel bad about (something wasted); (something wasted) arouse sympathy; (something valuable) wasted.
tmuu er a rengul(something) occurs to (person)/enters (person's) mind.
chelimimii a rengulsullen; obstinate; uncooperative.
komeklii a rengul(person) controlling themselves; (person) holding their tongue.
sisiokel a rengulfastidious; particular.
ulsarech a rengul(emotions etc.) held in.
mengelengalek a rengul(person) mean-spirited; unfriendly; unpleasant; nasty; vengeful.

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