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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blangch, v.r.s.bitten.
blangch a blengechel; mla obangch; a chad a blangch er a bilis, mangch, bengchel
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blerek, v.r.s.spread; stretched out; propagated.
blerek a mla oberek; berrokel, omerek a babier, merekii, merek a chais, berekel.
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cheluml, v.r.s.(fire) started up or kindled.
cheluml a mla mechuml; ngau a mla kmard.
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klsai, v.r.s.decreased; reduced.
klsai a kesai; ngelsonges; klsai er a rechad er a Belau.
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telik, v.r.s.struck with the fist.
telik a mla metik; tikir a kboub, tmik, melik, tkil a kboub.
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ulengoid, v.r.s.(food) given or exchanged ceremonially; messed up; put in wrong place.
ulengoid a mla merael a betok el chim; mla mongoid a chutem; ulengoid el cheleuid a rolel; ulechoid; cheliseksikd kung; ongidii a chutem, ongoid a udoud, ongidel.
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ulngibes, v.r.s.tempted; teased; seduced.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chemekill, v.a.s.(object which is stuck) is to be freed by inserting lever and prying; (person) is to be tripped or thrown by putting lever (e.g., stick, leg) between his legs.
chemekill a kirel el mechemekl; chomeklii, chomekl a kerrekar.
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chesechesall, v.a.s.is to be locked or latched.
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dkisall, v.a.s.is to be placed on slant.
dkisall a kirel el medkois; rullii el mo dkois, ulitech; smecher a dkisall e moues er a toktang, dkisii, dkisel.
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ngebakel, v.a.s.is to be ironed/planed.
ngebakel a kirel el mengabek; ngobekii a bail; nguabek a kerrekar; ngebekel.
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ongokall, v.a.s.is to be whistled to.
ongokall a kirel el mongaok ongaok a ngaok, ongokel.
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tebteball, v.a.s.is to be broken up in small pieces.
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ukall, v.a.s.is to be cut or pushed down.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
riamelfootball fruit (Pangi; Payan).bekeriamelsmell like football fruit; sweaty; have a strong body odor (especially, as result of diet or poor hygiene).
chaziflavor, taste.chaziflavor, taste.
teberoishin; (large, triangle-shaped) coconut candy.teberoishin; (large, triangle-shaped) coconut candy.
tebullswelling; earth mound.tebullbulging, hanging.
otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.
burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.burachedhaving skin covered with white spots.
karmasuuscowfish.karmasuus

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
telecherakl a rengulstubborn; obsessed; determined.
chetellaok a rengulchetellaok
olturk a rengulsatiate; make someone give up (from fatigue); get one's fill of; insult continuously or mercilessly; let someone really have it.
kedeb a rengulshort tempered; impatient.
omal er a rengulastonish; amaze; impress; cause admiration.
mengedidai er a rengul act stubbornly, scornfully or condescendingly.
olseked er a rengulstick to something (without giving up); be firm.

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