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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

derredirk, v.r.s.looked scornfully at.
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kliis, v.r.s.(ground) dug/scratched in (by chicken); opened or unlocked; (clock, watch) wound.
kliis a mla mekiis; kliokl; debull a kliis, kiesii el mo delluchel, kmiis, mengiis, kisel a debull.
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selam, v.r.s.thrust at.
selam a mla mesam; somur, selam a chimal el omekdakd; omekiam.
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selang, v.r.s.cut diagonally; held at angle.
selang a delebes el cherresokl; klengabel, delobech el diak le melemalt; bambuu a selang me ng kedorem; sengal.
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ulekdid, v.r.s.hereditary.
ulekdid a uldid; rruul a rolel; ngar ngii a did er ngii.
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ulsebek, v.r.s.made to fly.
ulsebek a mla mosebek; malk a ulsebek, mla suebek; osebekii, osebek a skoki.
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urrekerek, v.r.s.(juice, gravy) reboiled and thickened.
urrekerek a mla morekerek; mla mo medirt; urrekerek el uasech, merkerekii a miich, orekerekel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bechall, v.a.s.(long object) is to be thrown.
bechall a kirel el oboech; uloech a bechall. mechii, moech a biskang, bechel.
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chesuerngall, v.a.s.(face) is to be slapped; is to be slapped in the face.
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chetiotel, v.a.s.(point of knife, spear, etc.) is to be broken or bent.
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chuomel, v.a.s.is to be wrapped in leaves or betel nut fiber and baked.
chuomel a kirel el mechuum, chuemii, chuum a ngikel.
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kekerongel, v.a.s.is to be watched over or guided.
kekerongel a kirel el mekekar, omes er ngii; me lak le metemall; kokerengii a blil a kelebus, kokar a bangk, mengkar, kekerengel a bang
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tebetball, v.a.s.(long object) is to be divided or split into small pieces, strips, etc.
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tirterall, v.a.s.is to be hunted or investigated.
tirterall a siokel; kirel el meteriter; tirterii a klemerang; tiriter a ungil, merriter a tekoi; tirterel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
bangikoibutterfly; moth.bangikoibutterfly; moth.
idokeldirtiness; filthiness.idokel dirty; filthy.
berechsmell of raw fish.bekeberechsmell of the sea or raw fish.
semumtrochus.semum having deformed fingers or toes.
kosuiperfume.bekekosuismell strongly of perfume.
otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.
oreomelforest; woods.chereomel forested; covered with vegetation.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
moalech a renguldisappointed; dismayed.
omai er a rengulhesitate; be unsure about.
raud a rengulvariable; indecisive.
diak lodengelii a rengul(person) unaware of his limitations or overestimates his abilities or overextends himself with committments.
oubuch a rengultreat person as if he or she were one's spouse.
ulsarech a rengul(emotions etc.) held in.
milkolk a rengul(person is) stupid.

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