Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelemus, v.r.s.amputated; (person) having amputated limb.
chelemus a delebes; delebokl, chumsengii a chimal, chelemsengel.
See also:
delangch, v.r.s.set aside; recognized; mounded.
delangch mla medangch er a chutem; beluut er a chutem; rullii el mo mengerengird, dongchii a tuu; dmangch, dengchel.
See also:
rrebek, v.r.s.groped at.
rrebek a mla merebek; mla robekii a ochab el oba biskang.
See also:
uldaob, v.r.s.(klengoes) salted with sea water.
uldaob a mla mo er ngii a daob; ulsar; mdebii a klengoes, mdaob, udebel a klengoes
See also:
ulekesbas, v.r.s.littered; covered with trash.
ulekesbas a mla mukesbas; mekesbesir a mekesokes; ngar er ngii a besbas; ulekesbas el beluu a blil a rakd.
See also:
ulengchongch, v.r.s.dropped down from tree; (restriction) removed.
ulengchongch a mla mongchongche telerrob el telkib; ongchengchii a bul, ongchongch a chesimer, ongchengchel a bul er a uel.
See also:
ulet, v.r.s.pressed; squeezed; (food) soft (from hitting ground).
ulet a mla mouet; lius a ulet, tul a kerebou a ulet, omet, met, meseos, omeseos.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

beremall, v.a.s.(fish) is to be allowed to spoil slightly before wrapping and barbequeing.
beremall a kirel el mukberaom, mo beraom; beremel el ngikel.
See also:
besachel, v.a.s.is to be counted/named/mentioned.
See also:
delaol, v.a.s.is to be broiled or roasted.
delaol a kirel el medul; durur a mesekuuk, dmul a meas, ngikel a delaol.
See also:
ocheraol, v.a.s.is to be bought.
ocheraol a kirel el mochar; omechar a kall; skuul a ocheraol; ralm a ocheraol; mecherar, mechar, ocheral.
See also:
okrengaol, v.a.s.is to be embarrassed.
See also:
ongemiil, v.a.s.is to be carried or transported.
ongemiil a kirel el mongemai; ongkdall, olngemai a kall, ongemir a ilumel el mo er a bai.
See also:
utebengall, v.a.s.is to be fixed or focused upon.
utebengall a kirel el mutab; kirel el mo medengelii; mtab a meldung, mtebengii a rael; remenges e nguelem a tekoi; utebengel.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chaziflavor, taste.chaziflavor, taste.
tutkwart on sole of foot; disease of kebui leaves.tutkpointer; pole (for picking fruit).
uidglue; resin; fuel for lamp.muduidsticky; adhesive.
chiechabhole; hollow; cavity (in tooth).mechiechab(teeth) full of cavities.
daktfear; awe.bedektallfearful; shy.
brotechclapping; wooden paddle used as war weapon; applause; praise.bekebrotechprone to slapping.
kerasuschigger.kerasusbitten by chiggers.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
titmekl a rengultimid; scared.
sengok a rengulcurious.
olsebek er a rengulworry (unintentionally); startle.
bltkil a rengulone's affection/concern for.
ochemchuml a rengulseething inside with anger or hate.
ukab er a rengul(something sentimental) arouses one's emotions (touch someone's figurative heart).
mekngit a rengulfeel sorry/sad about; mean; inconsiderate.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.158.214.111','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')