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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelert, v.r.s.defecated on.
chelert a mla mechert; chortii, ngar er ngii a dach er ngii; chertel.
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klad, v.r.s.(sea cucumber) rolled/rubbed in ashes (to remove bad-tasting outer membrane).
klad er a chutem; a di dechudech el ta el chad. klad a mla mekad; kodir, kmad, mengad a cheremrum el mlai a mekoll er ngii; kedil.
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klekosek, v.r.s.cut; sliced; (pig) castrated; flattered.
klekosek a klekodek; selekosek
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klidet, v.r.s.(vine, small tree) cut with a single stroke. See mengidet.
klidet mla mekidet; delebes, teluk; mla medebes; kidetii a besebes, kmidet a dait, kdetel a dait.
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rrad, v.r.s.(flowers; etc.) picked.
rrad a mla merad; nglai a kebui a remad, redil a kebui.
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rrenged, v.r.s.(long object) tied together; joined.
rrenged a rrengodel; llechet, mla merenged; ebakl a rrenged.
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ultuil, v.r.s.laid down; lying down; dependent on.
ultuil a mla motuiil; otilii a bdelul er a tebel e olengull; ulsirs; otilel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bekesall, v.a.s.(leg) is to be moved to walk.
bekesall a sebechel el obakes el imuu er ngii, makes, mekesii, bekesel.
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kedngiil, v.a.s.is to be tamed.
kedngiil a kirel el mekedmokl el mo kedung; kudngir a ngalek, kudung, rullii el mo kedung.
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ngedall, v.a.s.is to be seen/sent off; is to be returned/sent back; (bride) is to be brought to prospective husband's family.
ngedall a kirel mengader; ngedall er a blil a chebechiil; ngoderii a ngelekel; merader a lleng el olekang; ngederel.
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ochebecheball, v.a.s.is to be put upside down; is to be turned face down.
ochebecheball a kirel el mochebecheb; omechebecheb er a dengarech; mechebecheb a olekang; ochebechebel a olekang.
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odikall, v.a.s.is to be banished, exiled or sent away.
odikall a kirel el modik; odikii; tuobed er a delengchokl; odik, odkikel.
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tibengedaol, v.a.s.(female) is to have sexual intercourse from rear.
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tiuall, v.a.s.is to be rubbed or smoothed over or petted.
tiuall a kirel el metaiu; melaiu er ngii; toiuii a chimal; tmaiu a bedengel; tiuel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
rirfallen leaves of kebui.merir(leaves) yellow.
tutkwart on sole of foot; disease of kebui leaves.tutkpointer; pole (for picking fruit).
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechashaving the qualities of an old woman.
bikodelhives or rash from allergies; allergic reaction affecting the skin.bikodelbroken out in hives.
bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).
tangtikebikelsee-saw; teeter-totter.tangtikebikelsee-saw; teeter-totter.
mekealdhot water; hot drink (esp., coffee).mekeald warm; hot.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
meleolt a rengul(person) carefree or nonchalant; (person) not easily disturbed or content to let things happen as they may.
urrengulelurungulel
merirem er a rengulhurt someone's feelings.
bebeot a rengulrather undecided about something; not taking something too seriously.
kesib a rengulangry.
ngelem a rengulsmart; clever; having a retentive memory.
smecher a rengulhomesick.

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