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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bliongel, v.r.s.divided; distributed; separated; separate.
bliongel a blii; mla obii, bliongel er a kall, blingelel a udoud, rusel, bingel.
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cheltiut, v.r.s.(headwear) put on; inserted; impaled.
cheltiut a mla mechetiut; ultuu; ulsiseb, cheltiut a oecherel e omais er a ulaol.
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klikai, v.r.s.(distance or course) swum.
klikai a mla mekikai; klikai a meteu el toachel; koikai, kikiul a cheroid.
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uldalem, v.r.s.(weapon) aimed; focused on or at.
uldalem a mla mudalem; melemalt el bedul ngii; biskang a uldalem el kirel a uel; omdalem er ngii.
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uldaob, v.r.s.(klengoes) salted with sea water.
uldaob a mla mo er ngii a daob; ulsar; mdebii a klengoes, mdaob, udebel a klengoes
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ulitech, v.r.s.made to lean to side; capsized; lying on one's side.
ulitech a mla muitech; omitech; dengchokl el dkois; ulitech e le ng meringel a sengchel; utechel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

cherungall, v.a.s.is to be made whole, completed or perfected.
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chesuertall, v.a.s.is to be covered with asphalt.
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demedomel, v.a.s.is to be levelled or equalized.
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ltukel, v.a.s.(someone) is to be remembered (because he will be a titled person).
ltukel a kirel a omelatk; ungil a omerellel el chad a ltukel; klou a omelatk el kirel; kedung el chad a ltukel, ltkel.
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ongeltall, v.a.s.is to be sunk (into soft ground).
ongeltall a olsiseb er a chelsel, kirel el mongelt, dait a ongeltall er a chutem, ongeltii.
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skuul, v.a.s.is to be put, packed or stuffed into.
skuul a kirel el mesuk; skuul a locha er a chelsel; smuk a kukau e sukur a ngikel; skul.
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techemekill, v.a.s.is to be stuffed or crammed.
techemekill a okekael; kirel el mo mui; metechemakl; mekekii, mekeek, techemekill a kliokl el chutem.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
sengerengerhunger; starvation.bekesengerengerget hungry easily; always getting hungry.
mudechvomit.bekemudechsmell of vomit.
chadliver.chedengaolsick with jaundice.
bausmell; odor; scent.bekebausmell of vagina.
mengchongchthick betel nut fiber used for wrapping food, making rain hat, etc.chellibelmengchongchwhite; (woman) beautiful/white-skinned.
oreomelforest; woods.chereomel forested; covered with vegetation.
bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
seselkang a rengulbecoming bored or impatient.
oba a rengulindependent; self-willed.
dmolech a rengulwise; prudent; careful in planning ahead.
omech er a rengultake the edge of one's hunger.
blotech a rengulpleased; satisfied; appeased.
omai er a rengulhesitate; be unsure about.
raud a rengulvariable; indecisive.

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