Hanahuda, the Palaun flower game

Palauns play a card game named hanahuda derived from a variant of the Japanese game, hanafuda. The game play is the same, but the scoring is slightly different.


The cards    The rules    The scoring   
The Cards

The cards are divided into the twelve months of the year, incorporating the kachoufuugetsu (four beauties of nature: flowers, birds, wind, and moon).

January
matsu ni tsuru
Crane Among Pines
       
February
ume ni uguisu
Nightingale Among Plum Trees
       
March
sakura ni tobari
Curtain Among Cherry Blossoms
       
April
fuji ni hototogisu
Cuckoo Among Wisteria
       
May
ayame ni yatsuhashi
Zigzag Bridge Among Irises
       
June
botan ni chou
Butterfly Among Peonies
       
July
hagi ni inoshishi
Wild Boar Among Bush Clover
       
August
susuki ni tsuki - kari
Moon Over Pampas Grass - Wild Geese
       
September
kiku ni sakazuki
Cup Among Crysanthemums
       
October
momiji ni shika
Deer Among Maple - Autumn Colours
       
November
ono michi-kaze - ni kaeru - yanagi ni tsubame
Frog Among Fields - Swallow Among Willows
       
December
kiri ni houou
Phoenix Among Paulownia
       


The rules

Non-dealer cuts the cards, and gets to see the bottom card. The dealer places 10 face up in the middle and then ten to each player (9 if 3 players, 8 if 4). The left-over cards are placed in a face-down stack in the middle of the table with the face-up cards scattered around the stack. In the four player game, players on opposite sides of the table are a team. Players alternate. On a turn, first a player plays a card from hand, capturing a face-up card if it shares a month with the played card. Otherwise the played card is added to the face-up collection. The same player then draws the top stack card and attempts to capture a face-up card. If no capture is possible the card is just added to the face-up collection. The action of playing the top stack card is called omkais. Dealing is called omerous.

 


The yaks

To score, players must collect various combinations of the cards.
The Japanese calls these combos yaku, the Palauns call them yaks.

Hanami ippai
Flower watching one cup
150    
Tsukimi ippai
Moon watching one cup
150    
Teppo
300      
Akatan
Three of the red ribbons (but not November)
100      
Aotan
The three purple ribbons
150      
Kosan
The three poetry ribbons
150      
Nizoro
The only yak comprised from a single month
200      
Ino-shika-cho
Boar, deer, butterfly
300      
Oozan (Ume-match-sakura)
great three
300      
Matsu-kiri-bzu (match-kiri-bo)
crane paulownia bald head
300      
Ume-match-kiri-bo
This may be a regional variation beteen different Palaun villages
400        
Matsu plus sakura (skok)
500        
Matsu plus sakura plus big Nizoro
the big five
700          
Arazi
Matsu plus plus plus
1000            
Nana-tang
Any seven ribbons
700              
Big score
All tens
10000