dui, n.title (for village chief or family head).
dui a kebekuul; meluchel a dui, lbedul a dial a merreder er a Bitalianged, Reklai a kuk dial a oba Bitalianged. Deruchall.
diakn.poss.1s
diamn.poss.2s
dialn.poss.3sdial a dui el ngii a oudui er ngii, ng kirel el tuchelii a dial.
dimamn.poss.1pe
diadn.poss.1pi
dimiun.poss.2p
dirirn.poss.3p
meluchel er a duiexpr.hold title.
Examples:
> Nothing stops Droteo from doing things./Droteo isn't easily discouraged.
> Don't return until you've found her.
> We are completely uninformed because we don't know any information (about that).
> Nothing will go wrong./Nothing will happen to it.
> I don't have time to go to the party.
Proverbs:
> He's like Chelebesoi of Ngeriil, dead in a fishtrap not his own.
A man named Chelebesoi (also the name of a fish) was robbing another man's fish trap when a head-hunting party came by and removed his head. He lost both his head and his reputation. The idiom may apply to one who gets hurt while trying to do someone else's job.
> You think only of Present, not of Future.
Chelechang (Present) and Chrechar (Future) were brothers. Present was the favorite of his mother. These are the words of Future reprimanding his mother. The idiom is used of those who inadequately plan for the future.
> Like the honey bee, celebrating without first boiling down the coconut syrup.
Once coconut syrup, dripping from the cut flower stem, is collected it is thickened by boiling. The honeybee, however, collects his nectar, puts it in the hive without boiling it, then proceeds to fly around noisily as though celebrating the completed task. Hence, to talk or boast loudly about successes and accomplishments when one has none; to make plans but never carry them out; to celebrate without cause.
> It's like the foam of the sea, which forms unexpectedly and then disappears.
It's a matter that comes up for lengthy discussions and then is dropped without resolution or effect. Some things, like sea foam, drift on without settlement. Endless discussion without reaching agreement.
> Our nose is close (to the mouth), but cannot be licked.
i.e. we shouldn't be too sure of, or overconfident in, ourselves. The nose is very close to the mouth, but, no matter how reassuringly available, it cannot be licked by the tongue. The idiom cautions those who are careless with their possessions to be less assured about wealth.
More Examples:
> The reason is, there are too many crimes in the society.
> It won't rain. It's just cloudy today.
> I'm not sleepy.
> Just make it clear that you really do not want to.
> What was said this morning will stay as is until we resume tomorrow.
suebek, v.i.fly (out from).
suebek a sebekreng; suebek a rengul; ng bekikl, ng medakd.
mesebesebek
/mesesebesebek
v.i.redup.fly around aimlessly; float in the wind.
mesebesebek a suebek; charm a mesebesebek.
sobekangv.i.inch.is starting to fly.
sobekang a mocha suebek; skoki a sobekang.
sobekungv.i.pred.is about to fly.
sobekung a mochu suebek; skoki a sobekung.
bekesbesebek a rengulexpr.easily worried; worrisome.
suebek a rengulexpr.worried; anxious.
suebek el charmexpr.bird.
suebek el dialexpr.airplane.
See also: , ,
Examples:
> We sort of became a little bit worried.
> I would fly away and find rest.
> You look really happy or elated.
> Peter became worried.
> I am worried.
Proverbs:
> Like the purple swamp hen, flying off with its legs hanging down
The purple swamp hen (uek; other sources name another bird, sechou [heron]) is careless about its legs when it flies, letting them dangle in flight instead of neatly tucking them up like other, more trim flyers. The saying applies to persons who do sloppy work or carelessly leave a task half finished
> You're a flying kite, but i hold the guide string.
No matter how much you play around, you always come back to me.
> Like a pigeon-seeing the danger, yet it flies from cover
The pigeon sits quietly concealed until some threat appears, then it flies out, revealing itself. The idiom applies to a person who unnecessarily exposes himself to danger, leaves the house in the rain, or takes a boat out in a storm.
> You're like the stork which flies with its legs dangling.
You leave unfinished business behind and split.
> Like the kingfisher, chattering while taking to wing.
The kingfisher, a restless, bullying bluebird, may be heard to chatter loudly when flying up from the ground or from a perch. The saying applies to one who suddenly spouts instructions to a group, then leaves, or to a leader at a meeting who impatiently interrupts a discussion with a burst of pronouncements, then ends the meeting.
More Examples:
> I was close to worrying everyone as I was a little late.

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