diak, v.s.is/are not; does not exist; non-existent.
diak a bechachau; diak a kall, diak a udoud, diak a chad er a blai.
diadiakv.s.redup.
dikeang
/di kea
/di keang
/dikea
v.s.inch.no longer; no more; not... after all.
di keang a mla er ngii e mla mo diak, udoud a di keang.
dimlakv.s.pastwere not; did not exist; was/were non-existent.
dimlak a di mla diak, dimlak le medung er a cheldecheduch, dimlak rengesii, dimlak lemei.
ng diakmod.no.
ngdiakcont.ng diak
diak a rengulexpr.inconsiderate; impolite.
mo diakexpr.run out; stop; disappear; become non-existent.
Examples:
> Droteo neither ate nor drank and just left.
> The rain's stopped.
> I don't know.
> That king had no bracelet, neither ornament.
> Nothing stops Droteo from doing things./Droteo isn't easily discouraged.
Proverbs:
> Like Kerosene, poling his canoe with no obvious destination
Under the German administrator Winkler before World War I, a Palauan named Ngirakerisil (Mr. Kerosene) was employed as a canoe operator. Daily he would take the tireless administrator to a different part of Palau to inspect the various economic programs (largely coconut planting) instituted by the now legendary Winkler. The operator, least of all, could predict where they would be going next. The idiom is applied to any aimless person or action; indecision; a changeable person.
> One for whom the door of words was not closed.
When the secrets of a clan or a profession were being taught by an expert, the house was completely closed and instruction took place in strict, whispered secrecy. the idiom may be applied to a person who, while having the proper status to be knowledgeable, has never learned in closed session; an important but uninformed person. Conversely, an expert or knowledgeable clan his torian is one who "has had the door closed" (mleng a simer).
> You're like the bisech plant in the backyard which has no purpose.
A person who isn't trusted so he/she is not needed.
> Like Beachedarsai's food, only a little but it does not disappear.
Beachedarsai and a friend, one day, went to heaven. On arrival they were very hungry, so they visited one of the gods who provided food for them. The "food" was one tiny piece of taro and a bit of fish. Beachedarsai thought to himself that this would hardly suffice, but he picked up the taro and ate it. As he did so another piece appeared on the plate. He ate the piece of fish and another piece of fish appeared. His friend also ate and on his plate as well a new piece of taro or fish appeared as each was consumed. When they were satisfied, there remained on their plates a piece of taro and fish. The idiom is applied to any small blessing, such as a small but steady income, or Western meals that, in contrast with the Palauan tray full of food, are served in small portions, and so on.
> Water is without cost.
Palauans bathe frequently; many will not miss a daily bath if at all possible. Bathing places are usually widened areas, natural or artificial (some elaborately paved with stone) in fresh-water streams. The phrase simply reminds another, probably a reluctant child, that he should bathe.
More Examples:
> I'm not shy.
> Sorry I missed your call yesterday.
> I didn't see them in the men's club house.
> I didnt see him or her there.
> Crookedness will not bear straight, it will always be crooked.

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