mei
/me
, v.i.come; arrive.
mei a okedongel a chad; mei er tiei, mei me kulekoi, ka mei.
bev.imp.be a ta er a telengtengil a tekoi el mengai er a tekoi el mei; be bong, be metengel.
blev.past.hypothetical
meracont.mei er a
merekung
/merkung
v.i.pred.is about to come or arrive.
mermang
/meremang
v.inch.meremang a merael mei; ngar er a omerolel el mei; dumiang er a dmuil.
mlei
/mle
v.pastcame; arrived.
mlei a mla mei me ngar tiang; skoki a mlei er a tutau.
mle a melekoi er a rrekui; Bung a mle tmuu; ng mle mekerang?
mleracont.mlei er a
be kbongexpr.goodbye; I'm leaving.
me e mong
/memong
expr.pass by; go on; "(in a direction) towards me and then keep going (past me)."
nguu el meiexpr.bring.
ta el buil er mla me e mongexpr.one month ago.
Examples:
> I wanted to come to this island.
> My car is really getting old and is making rattling noises.
> Let the child go play.
> Go home and sleep.
> Droteo was living away from Toki's house.
Proverbs:
> Like the cockroach of Ngerdobotar, staying on till it became white.
Presumably if a cockroach remains in the darkness for a long time, as one at Ngerdobotar (in Aimeliik) apparently did, it will turn white. Application pertains to a visitor who stays on and on, especially one who is not helpful in the household. Such behavior is not properly human; the person is somehow different, like a white cockroach.
> If it is my lunch it can be divided, if it is yours then it cannot
Two men habitually trapped fish in the same region of the lagoon. One would occasionally ask the other to join him at lunch, the other would always refuse. One day the man who refused arrived with no lunch. When the usual invitation was extended the man refused, saying that, anyway, he had no lunch. The invitation was insistently pressed until the reluctant one gave in. As they split the taro between them the one who shared made the above statement. The idiom is a mild rebuke of a retentive person
> Without looking afield, it was cut down behind the house.
From the folk tale concerning Mesubed Dingal, the inventor of the Palauan kite (see also No. 73). After his wife had been kidnapped, he constructed a kite using feathers from all the birds of Palau and he needed also wood from an Edebsungel tree to fashion the body of the bird-kite. After looking all over Palau and being on the point of giving up, he found the tree he needed behind his own house. The saying may be applied to anyone who does things the hard way, or who goes far afield to find something which is close at hand.
> Like the man of Kayangel, who procured his gifts from Keso
The saying refers to a man from the atoll of Kayangel, some twenty miles north of the main islands of Palau, who, on his way south to visit friends, stopped at an intermediate reef, Kesol, to fish for a present for his host. Refers to a person who, en route to a visit, tries to borrow a present from another guest; any person who suddenly wants to borrow money.
> I build it and you destroy it?
May be applied to a person who feels his aims or projects are being destroyed by the actions of another.
More Examples:
> John, forgive me, I made a stop at Ngerkumer's and may be a run a little late.
> Im scared of gossip. It ruins relationships.
> The return of the land to the original clan members went well as planned without any disruptions.
> These clams just released their eggs.
> I get sad when I think of my mom and dad that are gone.
sekkak, v.i., [From Japanese] go to special effort or trouble for; make a point of.
sekkak el meiyou went to all the trouble to come here
Examples:
> I've gone to all this trouble to come and get you, and (now) you don't want (to go).
> Toki made a special effort to fix up her place for a party, but not a single person came.

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