mei
/me
, v.i.come; arrive.
mei a okedongel a chad; mei er tiei, mei me kulekoi, ka mei.
bev.imp.be a ta er a telengtengil a tekoi el mengai er a tekoi el mei; be bong, be metengel.
blev.past.hypothetical
meracont.mei er a
merekung
/merkung
v.i.pred.is about to come or arrive.
mermang
/meremang
v.inch.meremang a merael mei; ngar er a omerolel el mei; dumiang er a dmuil.
mlei
/mle
v.pastcame; arrived.
mlei a mla mei me ngar tiang; skoki a mlei er a tutau.
mle a melekoi er a rrekui; Bung a mle tmuu; ng mle mekerang?
mleracont.mlei er a
be kbongexpr.goodbye; I'm leaving.
me e mongexpr.pass by; go on; "(in a direction) towards me and then keep going (past me)."
nguu el meiexpr.bring.
ta el buil er mla me e mongexpr.one month ago.
Examples:
> All the animals were starting to be really glad and they were somewhat comforted.
> Let them go swimming.
> People tend to start arriving at one o'clock.
> Droteo is so sick that when he tries to lift himself up with his arms, they just bend (in weakness).
> I was thinking or expecting that Toki would come to class, but she didn't come.
Proverbs:
> Like the man of Kayangel, who procured his gifts from Keso
The saying refers to a man from the atoll of Kayangel, some twenty miles north of the main islands of Palau, who, on his way south to visit friends, stopped at an intermediate reef, Kesol, to fish for a present for his host. Refers to a person who, en route to a visit, tries to borrow a present from another guest; any person who suddenly wants to borrow money.
> It's like the rat of Ngerard, which eats up all your coconuts and (then) all of ours.
It's a decision, plan etc. that will backfire. A pet rat owned by Mad, chief of Ngaraard, ate the coconuts of most of the chief's neighbors, then, still hungry, ate the chief's own coconuts.
> If it is my lunch it can be divided, if it is yours then it cannot
Two men habitually trapped fish in the same region of the lagoon. One would occasionally ask the other to join him at lunch, the other would always refuse. One day the man who refused arrived with no lunch. When the usual invitation was extended the man refused, saying that, anyway, he had no lunch. The invitation was insistently pressed until the reluctant one gave in. As they split the taro between them the one who shared made the above statement. The idiom is a mild rebuke of a retentive person
> Like the cockroach of Ngerdobotar, staying on till it became white.
Presumably if a cockroach remains in the darkness for a long time, as one at Ngerdobotar (in Aimeliik) apparently did, it will turn white. Application pertains to a visitor who stays on and on, especially one who is not helpful in the household. Such behavior is not properly human; the person is somehow different, like a white cockroach.
> Like his father, for he ate his father's premasticated food.
Applied to a child by adoption, with the implication that the adopted child resembles his adoptive father
More Examples:
> Mary, Lily, and Betty are wearing earrings.
> The dentist pulled my tooth so now I am drooling a lot.
> You all take turns bailing the boat so that it will be finished quickly.
> Our leaders just don't have any compassion.
> Cold/flu is spreading.

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