Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blir, v.r.s.(arm) swung; (rope) twirled.
blir a mla obir; mrengii a bir, mir a chimal, brengel.
See also:
chaibibeob, v.r.s.round; circular; (sl.) ok or all right.
chaibibeob a ibeob, chaibibeobel tebel, chelibeob el belatong; bleob a diak a bkul.
See also:
chelsechosu, v.r.s.splinted.
chelsechosu a chelam; llechotel e uldak er a medecher me ng diak le medeu.
See also:
ulchit, v.r.s.advanced past; defeated.
See also:
ulecheoch, v.r.s.asked for persistently.
ulecheoch a mla mocheoch; mla mesisiich el ongtir; mla mechechii a klok er ngak; ochechel a klok.
See also:
ultut, v.r.s.suckled; nursed.
ultut a mla otutur; mla tmut, otutur a tolechoi; otutul.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bekebekall, v.a.s.is to be gladdened or made happy.
bekebekall a kirel el obekebek, mekebekii a medal, rullii a rengul el mo ungil, mo diak le merur; omekebek er ngii, bekebekel.
See also:
debekill, v.a.s.is to be cursed.
debekill a kirel el medebeakl; melebeakl er ngii; kmal mekull el diak el debekill a chad, rechad.
See also:
desongel, v.a.s.is to be cut, sliced or slit (open).
desongel a kirel el mesekosek; dosengii, dmes a ngikel, meles, desengel.
See also:
kitall, v.a.s.is to be pressed with fingers and massaged; is to be pressed against surface with fingers; is to be softened.
kitall a kirel mekit; mengit er ngii; omet el mesisiich.
See also:
ngetachel, v.a.s.is to be cleaned, scrubbed or washed.
ngetachel a kirel el mengatech; ngotechii; ngmatech a mlai; ngetechel.
See also:
odeseball, v.a.s.is to be relieved from pain; overwork; etc.
odeseball a kirel el modoseb; mo duoseb; oldoseb, chad a odeseball a rengul; mo ungil a rengul; odesebii, odoseb, odesebel a reng.
See also:
tochall, v.a.s.is to be pre-chewed.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
kosuiperfume.bekekosuismell strongly of perfume.
koltgold.koltgold.
kimtype of large clam; female genitals.bekekimsmell of clams (after cleaning or cooking clams).
bangchbite.sekebangch(animal, person) prone to biting.
oreomelforest; woods.chereomel forested; covered with vegetation.
bukcorner; angle; joint; node.bkebkuulhaving many nodes; rough-edged; (shin of leg) have bumpy surface.
telengtungdwild tamarind; lead tree.telengtungdwoven with small weave.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
ukab er a rengul(something sentimental) arouses one's emotions (touch someone's figurative heart).
Dirrengulbaititle of feminine counterpart or assistant to chief in Imeliik.
mederdirk a rengulfeel scorn for.
belalk a rengulfeel shame/fright.
mengerar er a rengul criticise; insult; put down; make someone feel ashamed; hurt someone's feelings.
mekikiid a rengulunsympathetic; uncaring; uninvolved; emotionless.
olsarech er a rengulhold in or control emotions, anger etc.

WARN mysqli_query error
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','3.81.89.248','CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')