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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelderoder, v.r.s.put together or into order; arranged.
chelderoder a mla mechederoder choderoder a babier, chederderel a babier, ungil el blechobech.
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cheltiot, v.r.s.(point of knife, spear, etc.) broken or bent.
cheltiot a mla mechetiot; tmurk, obibais, telirm; choititii, chotiot a oles, chetitiel.
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deludeu, v.r.s.bent in many places.
deludeu a betok el deleu; mla medudeu, dour, dmeu a mamed, deul.
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telkool, v.r.s.(person) holding something in open palms.
telkool a teliko; beldoel.
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teluich, v.r.s.lighted; illuminated.
teluich a mla moues er a mellomes; mla metuich; tmuich a ngikel; tuiechii a medal; meluich er tir; tichel.
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ulekdubech, v.r.s.(plant) cultivated; (business, etc.) established or started.
ulekdubech a ngar ngii; di mla mukdubech; Belau a ulekdubech a skuul er ngii; klaingeseu er a ocheraol el blai a ulekdubech er a rechuodel el mei.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chebingel, v.a.s.(fruit) is to be picked or plucked.
chebingel a kirel el mechib; chibngii,chuib, meradel a chebingel, chebngel.
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dedesall, v.a.s.(place) is to be cleared.
dedesall a kirel el mo mededaes; dmedesii, blai a dedesall diak le chelimeluk, dmedaes.
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lkiil, v.a.s.(bottom of pot; basket) is to be lined with leaves; etc.
lkiil a kirel el melik; loia lkil; likir a chelais er a ngimes, lmik, lkil.
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okesiaol, v.a.s.is to be compared, copied, imitated, made the same, evened out, or mixed through; is to be matched (by other half or part).
okesiaol a kirel el mokesiu; mekesiur, mekesiu, okesiul; mo osisiu.
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tiuelechall, v.a.s.is to be thrown at with a stick.
tiuelechall a kirel el metiualech; tiuelechii a iedel; toiualech, meliualech a meradel, tiuelechel.
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udidall, v.a.s.is to be bridged.
udidall a kirel el mudid; loia did er ngii; omdid er a toachelmid; mdidar, omoachel a udidal a delebechel er a didall.
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udochall, v.a.s.(sea) is to be beaten with pole; (fruit) is to be knocked down with pole.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chedeadjellyfish; nettle.chedead not knowing where to go.
klukuktomorrow; the next or following day.klukuk be tomorrow; be the next or following day.
ngelloklnodding; dozing (off).olengelloklnod when sleepy; doze off.
telengtungdwild tamarind; lead tree.telengtungdwild tamarind; lead tree.
bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).bobaidull; slow-witted.
besokelringworm.besokelinfected with ringworm.
maiscorn.maisblond.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
melekoi a renguldetermined; well-motivated; make rasping or humming sound in the lungs; make humming moise while sleeping; (cat) purr.
outekangel er a rengulpersevere; force (oneself) to do something.
seselkang a rengulbecoming bored or impatient.
bebeot a rengulrather undecided about something; not taking something too seriously.
melechang a llechul a rengulteach (someone) a lesson.
kekere a renguluncomfortable; impatient.
ngelekel a rengulfavorite child.

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