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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

cheldeng, v.r.s.confused; puzzled; perplexed.
cheldeng a milkolk a rengul; diak le mesaod a tekoi er ngii.
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delibek, v.r.s.kicked (away); swept away; fended off.
delibek a mla medibek; melibek a bduu, dibekii, duibek a bduu el olab a uach, dbekel.
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selmesumech, v.r.s.bidden farewell; given divorce payment; refused gracefully.
selmesumech a mla mesmesumech; buch a diak el selmesumech; diak a olmesmechel; mla merael.
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telaiu, v.r.s.rubbed; smoothed over; petted.
telaiu a mla metaiu; mla toiuii a bdelul; mla tmaiu a bedengel, melaiu er ngii; tiuel a smecher.
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telecheb, v.r.s.removed; scraped up; cut out; uprooted.
telecheb a nglai el cheroid; mla metecheb a belsiich; tuecheb a chetermall; tochebii a debsel a lius.
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ulsiaol, v.r.s.(drawer, suitcase, etc.) closed; (clothes) have seam sewn; (fire) fed; (people) incited to fight.
ulsiaol a ulsiolel; sei el mo ulsiu er ngii; a ikei el mo kaisiuekl; okul a tet a ngar er a ulsiaol.
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ultitechakl, v.r.s.put or pushed aside.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bedesall, v.a.s.(fish) is to be boiled in water; (tongue) is to be cut.
bedesall a mereched el mo marek, modes a ngikel, bedakl el diokang.
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chedechedechaol, v.a.s.is to be talked about or discussed.
chedechedechaol a kirel el mo rengii a tekoi; kirel el mechedecheduch; chedechedechaol el kirel a betok el ngodech el omerellel.
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chemechemall, v.a.s.is to be urinated on.
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chetekill, v.a.s.is to be held or led by the hand; is to be carried, towed or persuaded; easily persuaded; (woman) easily seduced.
chetekill a beot el mechetakl; di ngera e ng mechetakl; diak a uldesuel; di remurt a ngor; choteklii, cheteklel.
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chetuul, v.a.s.(fish) smoked; having the potential of giving off too much smoke.
chetuul a kirel el mechat; techa mengat a ngikel? chotur, chemat a ngikel, chetul.
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imekill, v.a.s.is to be loosened.
imekill a kirel el mo mimokl; imeklii a delibuk, mo diak le kes a lechetel a chim, imeklel.
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odikall, v.a.s.is to be banished, exiled or sent away.
odikall a kirel el modik; odikii; tuobed er a delengchokl; odik, odkikel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chedeadjellyfish; nettle.chedeadjellyfish; nettle.
kelebusjail, prison.kelebusjailed; in jail; (child, etc.) undergoing punishment.
telengtungdwild tamarind; lead tree.telengtungdwoven with small weave.
builmoon; month.builmoon; month.
chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).chermall having vagina which lubricates quickly.
kerasuschigger.kerasusbitten by chiggers.
chelechelouldandruff.chelecheloulhaving dandruff.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
mekreos a rengulmiserly; avaricious; selfish.
raud a rengulvariable; indecisive.
mengeokl er a rengulburden; bother; cause concern; weigh on.
omult er a rengulconvince; persuade.
ngemokel a renguldesirous off; lusting after.
bekongesengasech a renguleasily angered; excitable.
beltik a rengulbetik a rengul

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