aika
/aikang
, pro.these objects/animals near speaker and near listener.
aikalcont.aika el
aika el hongexpr.these books.
Examples:
> I'm doing these things for you (pl.) benefit.
> I am going to read you a list of statements and you tell if you agree, disagree, neutral or don't know.
> These pencils are thin.
> The amount of money has become more than the cost of the house.
> This is (my) food to tide me over in case I get hungry.
Proverbs:
> This liver is shark.
A blind man lived with his wife and son at Ngetmel (in Ngerechelong, northern Palau). Since he was blind, his wife and son would often fool him. For one thing, she would leave him in charge of their prize piece of money, indicating its hiding place, when she left for work in the gardens. But before she left she would hide it in another place. One day when he was alone, his brother came to visit and to help around the house. The blind man asked him to gather some wood for a fire so he could warm himself. The brother did so and left. While the man warmed himself, he found, to his surprise, that he could see a little. The following day, with his improved sight, he found out about the money deception and located the real hiding place of the money. Once more his brother visited, and the blind man asked what wood he had used in the fire. The wood was driftwood and he had his brother build another fire. Again his sight improved and he was so pleased that he invited his brother to stay and help himself to some ray-fish liver. The brother looked at the liver and told the man that it was not ray-fish but shark liver. With this the man realized that he had really been deceived, for shark's liver is hardly considered worth eating. Hurt and angered, he told his brother to find the piece of money, pointing out its actual location, and gave it to his brother, saying his wife and son deserved nothing. When the wife came home she at once looked for the money. Unable to find it, she asked her supposedly blind husband about it and, of course, he insisted that she would find it in the place she had pointed out to him, since he had not touched it. Finally she gave up the search and exclaimed: "It simply isn't here." To this he replied: "This liver is shark." The saying may be used when one has discovered another's deception or when a person faces a very frustrating or defeating situation.
More Examples:
> Stop picking on your sores that's why they don't get healed!
> Do you want to take some of these food home when you leave?
> My knives have gone missing.
> These uncooked baskets of taro had to be carried by the young men to the boat at the channel to go on the trip.
> She looks so beautiful with her traditional grass skirt and decorations except her lips look inside out with that lipstick.
chad, n.liver.
chad a ta er a klekedellel a bedengel a chad, charm; chedengal a rrull.
chedengaln.poss.3schedengal a chad; chedengal a babii, chedengal a rrull.
Aika chedengal (a matukeoll)!interj.Exclamation indicating surprise; often used after realizing a deception. See it's entry in Proverbs for more information.
chedengaolv.s.have a large liver.
chedengaol a melaok a chedengal; chedengaol el rrull.
chedengaolv.s.sick with jaundice.
chedengaol a secher, rekdel a chad.
Examples:
> Human beings are made or born to be hungry.
> The skillful fisherman speared 20 fish in the head.
> If there are fifty innocent people in the city, then ...
> Is Melii wiping off anyone's tables?
> Are you going to call anyone's cats?
Proverbs:
> It's like taking a shower at Tellei's bath, when somebody takes a shower, you shiver from the cold.
Someone's actions makes you embarrassed.
> Like the man of Ngesias, who left his serving of food to chase a chicken
Refers to a young man of Ngesias who was with a girl in the bush and was on the brink of persuading her to make love when he saw and gave chase to a chicken. Of course, he lost both the girl and the chicken. One may leave one task unfinished and initiate another, failing at both
> Don't be like the man from Ngerchemai who lost both the turtle and the canoe.
Don't bite off more than you can chew...don't be selfish.
> A person whose breechcloth is loose.
A poorly organized man, naive, openminded, generous, but not manly.
> Like the people of Ngerechelong, standing together on the base of the coconut tree.
The mound or hump that forms at the base of the coconut tree is said to represent the highest ranking village clan. The leader of that clan is spoken of as "standing on the mound." In the idiom, it is suggested that the people of Ngerechelong (northern Palau) would all like to be leaders-all standing on the mound at the same time. The idiom may be applied where too many people try to direct an operation; too many leaders.
More Examples:
> I don't want to go listen to the politicians speak because they're so boring and talk forever but I wouldn't mind just going to eat the food.
> When is his/her funeral?
> Who is the best at pingpong at this school?
> I think people in Airai should make toll booths at the airport and collect fees.
> What are you like?

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