diak, v.s.is/are not; does not exist; non-existent.
diak a bechachau; diak a kall, diak a udoud, diak a chad er a blai.
diadiakv.s.redup.
dikeang
/di kea
/di keang
/dikea
v.s.inch.no longer; no more; not... after all.
di keang a mla er ngii e mla mo diak, udoud a di keang.
dimlakv.s.pastwere not; did not exist; was/were non-existent.
dimlak a di mla diak, dimlak le medung er a cheldecheduch, dimlak rengesii, dimlak lemei.
ng diakmod.no.
ngdiakcont.ng diak
diak a rengulexpr.inconsiderate; impolite.
mo diakexpr.run out; stop; disappear; become non-existent.
Examples:
> Can I request that you please drop me off?
> It doesn't make any sense./He's completely disoriented.
> There's nothing he doesn't have at his house.
> Nothing will go wrong./Nothing will happen to it.
> But the Most High God does not live in houses built by human hands.
Proverbs:
> It's like the way they eat in Ngeraus,as soon as they begin to enjoy the food, it's gone.
When something becomes popular, it becomes unavailable.
> He's like Chelebesoi of Ngeriil, dead in a fishtrap not his own.
A man named Chelebesoi (also the name of a fish) was robbing another man's fish trap when a head-hunting party came by and removed his head. He lost both his head and his reputation. The idiom may apply to one who gets hurt while trying to do someone else's job.
> It's like Beachedarsai's food, though small in quantity, it never runs out.
Something beneficial(money, food, etc) keeps coming in steadily(from unknown source).
> An ukall tree won't become a titimel tree.
i.e., a child will resemble its father; human nature will not change. The ukal, a lumber tree, resembles the titiml, a fruit bearing tree, at least to the extent that both are trees and become quite large. Both have assets but are quite different. The idiom is applied in the sense that a child resembles its father and will become what its father was. It may also be used to mean "human nature can't be changed."
> The nose is right there, but it can't be licked
The nose is very close to the mouth, but, no matter how reassuringly available, it cannot be licked by the tongue. The idiom cautions those who are careless with their possessions to be less assured about wealth.
More Examples:
> Dont always cry.
> Honey, cant you pound some taro so we could eat?
> My kids are so unruly sometimes.
> I didn't see them in the men's club house.
> Go check the rambutan in the rain forest. If there are ripe ones, bring them home but make sure to hide them so people don't bum them off you.

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