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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blellokl, v.r.s.made to sway.
blellokl a mla obellokl; kerrekar el dullokl, melleklii, mellokl a bderrir.
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cheleseb, v.r.s.(taro tubers) cut.
cheleseb a mla mecheseb, chosebii, cheleseb el dait a ileakl er a kukau, mla medebes.
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chelosm, v.r.s.tapped or rapped on; rung.
chelosm a mla mechosm; chosmii, mengosm er a kambalang, chesmel.
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delidab, v.r.s.climbed on.
delidab a mla medidab; ngmasech er ngii; doidebur a lius, doidab a buuch, ngomiakl.
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uldid, v.r.s.bridged.
uldid a mla mudid; ngar er ngii a did er ngii el omoachel; didil.
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ultilech, v.r.s.has had something put on top of it.
ultilech a ulsarech, mla motilech, ultilech er a mlai; mlai a ngar er a bebul; otelechii.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bengodel, v.a.s.is to be put or held on or against.
bengodel a kired el omenged er ngii; mengedii, omenged, kebui a bengodel er a kerrekar, bengedel.
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chedukl, v.a.s.is to be paved with stones.
chedukl a kirel el mechades; chodesii a rael, chemades, olbed a chedukl, chedesel.
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isechemall, v.a.s.is to be held or grasped firmly.
isechemall a kirel el musechem; orekedii e kiresii; diak el isechemall a udoud me a chutem.
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ketmekill, v.a.s.is to be straightened up, arranged, cleaned or prepared.
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orekodel, v.a.s.is to be held onto or grasped.
orekodel a kirel el moreked; orekodel a ngalek; omerael a orekodel e le eolt a meses, orked
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otelechekill, v.a.s.is to be accused/suspected.
otelechekill a kirel el motelechakl; chad a di ngii el omekedong a otelechakl; otelecheklii e le ng mlo tmuu er a diak el blil; otelecheklel.
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sikesall, v.a.s.(raft, canoe, etc.) is to be poled.
sikesall a kirel el mesikes; sikesii a mlai; smikes, melikes a brer; sikesel a brer.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
dechuswart; mole.dechuswart; mole.
burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.burachedhaving skin covered with white spots.
singodor of sperm.besingsmell of sperm; smell unclean (esp., used in insults referring to women).
chetbaelelephantiasis.chetbael swollen from elephantiasis.
chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.
kodalldeath.diak a kodelleleternal; everlasting.
tutkwart on sole of foot; disease of kebui leaves.tutkpointer; pole (for picking fruit).

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
klurt a rengul(feelings) hurt.
dechal a rengul perseverance; ambition; strong will.
omak er a rengul(person) takes the edge off (his/her) hunger.
melaok a renguladulterous; acquisitive.
omai er a rengulhesitate; be unsure about.
omud a rengulfed up with; exasperated; can't stand.
omekerrau er a rengulconfuse; puzzle.

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