Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

berriid, v.r.s.scattered; spread; sown; dismantled.
berriid a diak le chelludel; mriid, rechad a berrid.
See also:
chelas, v.r.s.blackened with soot or ink; (pot) burned or discolored.
chelas a delul; mla mechas; chosir, chemas a ngeliokl.
See also:
chelmekl, v.r.s.(person) stubborn, persistent, determined, etc.
chelmekl a mla mechemekl a rengul; mengemekl, chomeklii, mesisiich el oltaut a loumerang.
See also:
ngelmors, v.r.s.extracted; picked or pulled out.
ngelmors a mla mengmors; mengai er a ulechull; ngelmors a bambuu; ngimersii a oluches; ngimersel.
See also:
uldibsobs, v.r.s.filled to overflowing; poured out.
See also:
ulngebeet, v.r.s.pushed under water; (wick of lamp) turned down.
See also:
urrodech, v.r.s.buttoned; inlaid.
urrodech a mla murodech; ngar ngii a urdechel.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chilotel, v.a.s.is to be oiled, greased or anointed.
See also:
debachel, v.a.s.is to be chopped down.
debachel a kirel el medobech; medebes, metuk, dobesii, dobechii a kerrekar, duobech a bambuu, melobech a ngikel,
See also:
idesall, v.a.s.(fruit) is to be pared or shredded.
idesall a kirel el meiides; bobai a idesall, idesii a bobai, melides er ngii, idesel.
See also:
ngimersall, v.a.s.is to be extracted; is to be picked or pulled out.
ngimersall a kirel el mengmors; melmors a ochur; ngimersii a kot, ngimors, ngimersel.
See also:
osiseball, v.a.s.is to be put, pushed or forced in.
osiseball a kirel el mosiseb; oltuu, mekull el diak el osiseball a ice er a Belau.
See also:
sengdall, v.a.s.is to be combed; (chain, cord, etc.) is to broken.
sengdall a kirel el mesongd; songdii, smongd a bderrir; sengdel
See also:
utichioll, v.a.s.is to be changed, replaced or succeeded.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
techiirhandnet with handle; cloth or screen for pressing coconut milk; sheath at base of coconut frond (used for pressing coconut milk).mekudem a techerel(person who) understands or catches everything.
riklbold/violent behavior.meriklbold; violent; restless.
cheremrumtype of sea cucumber; trepang.bekecheremrumsmell of sea cucumber.
bisechwild taro (makes mouth itchy).bisechwild taro (makes mouth itchy).
mechiechab hole.mechiechab hole.
chadliver.chedengaolhave a large liver.
cheluchcoconut oil; fuel (e.g. gasoline, kerosene, diesel oil, etc.); grease (from meat being cooked).bekecheluchsmell of coconut oil.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
melatk a rengulconsider someone's feelings.
mengesib er a rengul get someone angry.
uldalem a rengulresponsible; purposeful.
mesbeda a rengul(person) come to realize or accept (fact, etc.).
chidirengulchaidirengul
orrechorech a rengulextremely angry; wild with anger.
sisiokel a rengulfastidious; particular.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.158.52.166','CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')