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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bled, v.r.s.(ball; etc.) caught; grabbed; (money) borrowed.
bled a mla obed; medir a bduu, bedeel
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blosech, v.r.s.broken open; postponed; contradicted; opposed; strange; unusual.
blosech a mla meterob, omosech, mesechii a urreor, mosech, besechel a urreor.
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cheldelekelek, v.r.s.blackened; (face) slapped.
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delbard, v.r.s.laid crosswise; perpendicular; (speech, behavior) inappropriate.
delbard a diak el llemolem; ka el melemalt, tochedesuch, tbard, kerrekar a delbard er a rael, diberdel.
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telechiir, v.r.s.caught with a handnet.
telechiir a nglai; mla metechiir; mla obed; ticherii a iedel, tichiir a meradel, techerel.
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telmotm, v.r.s.sucked in, on or out; dredged; syphoned; kissed.
telmotm a telimd; mla metmotm; timotm a titimel; timetmii a mengur, melmotm, timetmel.
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ulekbat, v.r.s.(something) hidden or hard to find.
ulekbat a meringel el osiik; bulis a omekbat er a olsiseb mekngit el kar er a Belau; ulekbat er a milosii a president; mla mukbat.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

otechall, v.a.s.is to be pierced or drilled through.
otechall a kirel el motoech, otechii a ungil el uldasu, otoech a mederir, otechel.
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rengsall, v.a.s.(hair) is to be pomaded.
rengsall a kirel merenguus; mekedelial el chui a rengsall, runguus, rengsel.
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rsachel, v.a.s.(food, betel nut, medicine) is to be pounded; is to be punched.
rsachel a kirel el merusech; kukau a rsachel; remusech a belsiich.
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tekiungel, v.a.s.needs to be talked to; (person) is being talked about (because of bad behavior, etc.).
tekiungel a kirel el mo er ngii a tekoi; soadel er a beluu, tekiungel er a beluu er a omengubs.el sers.
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timetmall, v.a.s.is to be sucked in, on or out; is to be dredged or syphoned; is to be kissed.
timetmall a kirel metmotm; melmotm er ngii; timetmii a titimel, timotm a medal a ngikel; timetmel.
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tuidel, v.a.s.is to be cut lengthwise or down the middle.
tuidel a kirel metiud; meliud er ngii; tiuedii a bobai; tmiud a brak, tudel.
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uchelall, v.a.s.is to be started or begun.
uchelall a kirel el meuchel; otutall; urreor a uchelall, mechelii a omelaml; muchel, uchelel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

tebullswelling; earth mound.tebullswelling; earth mound.
kodalldeath.diak a kodelleleternal; everlasting.
chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.
kimtype of large clam; female genitals.bekekimsmell of clams (after cleaning or cooking clams).
kemimstarfruit.mekemimsour; acidic; spoiled (from having turned sour).
chetaubrief rain squall.chetau (skin) dark.
ngelloklnodding; dozing (off).olengelloklnod when sleepy; doze off.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

diak lemesim a rengulstick to one's convictions; not change one's mind.
mesbesubed er a rengulprepare someone (psychologically) for something; pave the way for more serious discussion with someone; inform gradually or indirectly.
bekesbesebek a renguleasily worried; worrisome.
derengulalso, used a as friendly expression of envy.
mechitechut a rengulweak willed; unmotivated; easily discouraged.
melekoi a renguldetermined; well-motivated; make rasping or humming sound in the lungs; make humming moise while sleeping; (cat) purr.
omech er a rengultake the edge of one's hunger.

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