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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blerroel, v.r.s.speared with beroel.
blerroel a mla oberoel; berruchel er a beroel, omeroel, merelii, berelel.
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bles, v.r.s.in a state of having forgotten something/having put something out of one's mind.
bles a mla obes; urriid er a omelatk, bles er a urreor, klou el bes.
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chelid, v.r.s.(neck) turned to one side; (something) twisted or wrung.
chelid a omur; chidir a chiklel, chelid a chiklel, mengid er a chiklel; chelid a telemall el delomel, dait el delebes el cheroid er techel me ng diak el dubech.
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delebachel, v.r.s.chopped down.
delebachel a mla medobech; delobech er a kedorm, melobech, dobechii, duobech a ngikel, debechel.
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ilild, v.r.s.(fruit, tapioca, taro, etc.) peeled.
ilild a nglai a budel; mla meild, ildii a diokang, imild a diokang, ildel.
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klderaol, v.r.s.moored with outrigger away from shore.
klderaol a ulak, mlil a omerael a klderaol er a cheldukl; koderolii, koderaol a mlai er a klemedaol; kederolel.
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teleberall, v.r.s.(eyebrows) raised.
teleberall a telebek; mla meteberall a medal; toberall; teberellel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chetekill, v.a.s.is to be held or led by the hand; is to be carried, towed or persuaded; easily persuaded; (woman) easily seduced.
chetekill a beot el mechetakl; di ngera e ng mechetakl; diak a uldesuel; di remurt a ngor; choteklii, cheteklel.
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chuomel, v.a.s.is to be wrapped in leaves or betel nut fiber and baked.
chuomel a kirel el mechuum, chuemii, chuum a ngikel.
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dedesall, v.a.s.(place) is to be cleared.
dedesall a kirel el mo mededaes; dmedesii, blai a dedesall diak le chelimeluk, dmedaes.
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duul, v.a.s.is to be folded/creased/bent.
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osisechekill, v.a.s.is to be taught, instructed, trained.
osisechekill a kirel el mosisechakl; osisecheklii, metitur a osischekill, osisechakl el kirel a metitur; osisecheklel.
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sbochel, v.a.s.(branches, etc.) are to be broken off.
sbochel a kirel el mesibech; mengai el mei er eou; rechelel a iedel a sbochel, sibechii, suibech a rachel, sbechel
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tibechall, v.a.s.is to be touched lightly.
tibechall a kirel el metboech; tibechii a sechelil; tiboech; melboech er ngii; tibechel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
hambunghalf.hambunghalf-witted; simple-minded.
bsibsdrill; termite.teribisibsfull of holes.
rekungland crab.bekerekungsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs, etc.).
rubakelder; old man; chief; foreign man; boyfriend; husband.rubakhaving the qualities of an old man.
chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.
iudoraiburent-a-car; U-drive car.iudoraibu (woman) loose or fast.
oreomelforest; woods.chereomeloreomel

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
mereng er a rengulplease; go along with (so as not to hurt feelings).
metitngall a rengullonesome; sad (at broken friendship).
cheldeng a rengulconfused; surprised; stubborn; dull-witted; slow (in understanding).
bltkil a rengulone's affection/concern for.
cheberdil a rengulobject of one's feelings/affections.
bebeot a rengulrather undecided about something; not taking something too seriously.
turk a rengulturk

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