bedul, n.head; leader.
bedul a bdelul; bdelul a chad, bingsbedul, bdelul a beluu; bedul er a omoachel
bdelukn.poss.1s
bdelumn.poss.2s
bdeluln.poss.3sbdelul a bedul er ngii; bdelul a chad bdelul a beluu, bdelul a cheldebechel; bdelulachang.
bdelmamn.poss.1pe
bdeludn.poss.1pi
bdelmiun.poss.2p
bdelrirn.poss.3p
bdelul a chang
/bdelulachang
expr.end of jetty; landing pier.
bdelulachang a olekerodel, omekuul er a mlai, bilas; kerodel.
bdelul a cheldebechelexpr.group leader.
bdelul a omeraelexpr.tour leader.
btil a bedulexpr.back of head.
mekngit a bdelulexpr.stupid.
tedobech a bdelul expr.crazy.
See also: ,
Examples:
> At 7:00 a.m. I dress and comb my hair.
> Let me comb your hair.
> The school faces in the direction of M-Dock.
> The sun is shining so hard and she's at the farm with nothing on her head.
> Droteo is bathing upstream.
Proverbs:
> Attaching the drain spout to oneself.
Pertains to favoritism, the adjustment of the flow of favors from the leader to one-self. It is considered unsporting and in poor taste to seek favoritism through undue support of a leader in direct anticipation of favors.
> Your mother's brother's head is discarded at Emerert.
In head-hunting days villages on the same side-haven as Koror, or otherwise allied, would visit Koror last with heads taken in raids or ambush after visiting several allied villages for dances and money collections marking a successful hunt. By and large, the purpose of head-hunting was economic, with money paid the men of the successful raiding club at each allied village where the heads would be displayed. The collection went to the coffer of their village chief. By the time the warriors reached Koror, then, the heads would often be quite odorous and unpleasant (economically useless). So they would be discarded at a place called Emerert in Koror. From the standpoint of any male ego the mother's brother (okdemaol; okdemelem: your mother's brother) is always significant, since one such individual usually acts as guardian and financial advisor for the younger clan member. The idiom, then, is used by the people of Koror to insult persons of other, generally hostile, villages.
More Examples:
> I fell on the stone path and cracked my head.
> They were pushing each other and he slipped and split his head.
> My head is aching and I feel dizzy.
> Ah! Where this life going.
> Yigo is located on the north side of the island.

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