chad, n.liver.
chad a ta er a klekedellel a bedengel a chad, charm; chedengal a rrull.
chedengaln.poss.3schedengal a chad; chedengal a babii, chedengal a rrull.
Aika chedengal (a matukeoll)!interj.Exclamation indicating surprise; often used after realizing a deception. See it's entry in Proverbs for more information.
chedengaolv.s.have a large liver.
chedengaol a melaok a chedengal; chedengaol el rrull.
chedengaolv.s.sick with jaundice.
chedengaol a secher, rekdel a chad.
Examples:
> I saw the canoe that those men carved.
> Steven is helping that person.
> I will call those people's cats.
> 20 fish were speared in the head by the skillful fisherman.
> These people with headaches are going to the hospital.
Proverbs:
> The light of youth is darkness.
A young person may display pride or may be showy in dress habits; youth may shine, but the brilliance does not mean enlightenment.
> It's like when the men of Ngesias clamored over what they had lost (after a party of raiders had attacked without warning and taken a head as a trophy).
The men of the Ngesias (Peleliu) village club were sitting near their clubhouse one evening when raiders broke through the brush, shouted wildly, and excaped with the head of one of them. When they recovered their senses, the men jumped to their spears and shouted threats into the darkness of the surrounding brush. Aroused by the commotion, the village chief appeared and ,when appraised of the situation, admonished them to be quiet since the fuss would gain nothing. "Don't cry over spilt milk."
> Like the man of Kayangel, who procured his gifts from Keso
The saying refers to a man from the atoll of Kayangel, some twenty miles north of the main islands of Palau, who, on his way south to visit friends, stopped at an intermediate reef, Kesol, to fish for a present for his host. Refers to a person who, en route to a visit, tries to borrow a present from another guest; any person who suddenly wants to borrow money.
> Like a man circumcised, insufficient skin.
Circumcision seems to have been known in Palau prior to contact, perhaps through contact with the Philippines, but was not widely practiced. As in this context, it usually draws attention in the form of ridicule. The idiom applies to any circumstance in which there has been insufficient preparation or planning; a premature decision.
> One for whom the door of words was not closed.
When the secrets of a clan or a profession were being taught by an expert, the house was completely closed and instruction took place in strict, whispered secrecy. the idiom may be applied to a person who, while having the proper status to be knowledgeable, has never learned in closed session; an important but uninformed person. Conversely, an expert or knowledgeable clan his torian is one who "has had the door closed" (mleng a simer).
More Examples:
> What are you like?
> Who is the best baseball at this school?
> I'm from Peliliu
> Which Island of Palau are you from?
> He or she is a tall person.

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