dui, n.title (for village chief or family head).
dui a kebekuul; meluchel a dui, lbedul a dial a merreder er a Bitalianged, Reklai a kuk dial a oba Bitalianged. Deruchall.
diakn.poss.1s
diamn.poss.2s
dialn.poss.3sdial a dui el ngii a oudui er ngii, ng kirel el tuchelii a dial.
dimamn.poss.1pe
diadn.poss.1pi
dimiun.poss.2p
dirirn.poss.3p
meluchel er a duiexpr.hold title.
Examples:
> She doesn't miss anything./Nothing gets by her.
> It's not so good.
> I wonder whether or not Toki should go to Guam.
> Nothing makes Droteo give up what he's doing.
> There isn't anything that frightens me.
Proverbs:
> He's like Chelebesoi of Ngeriil, dead in a fishtrap not his own.
A man named Chelebesoi (also the name of a fish) was robbing another man's fish trap when a head-hunting party came by and removed his head. He lost both his head and his reputation. The idiom may apply to one who gets hurt while trying to do someone else's job.
> Without looking afield, it was cut down behind the house.
From the folk tale concerning Mesubed Dingal, the inventor of the Palauan kite (see also No. 73). After his wife had been kidnapped, he constructed a kite using feathers from all the birds of Palau and he needed also wood from an Edebsungel tree to fashion the body of the bird-kite. After looking all over Palau and being on the point of giving up, he found the tree he needed behind his own house. The saying may be applied to anyone who does things the hard way, or who goes far afield to find something which is close at hand.
> Like Kerosene, poling his canoe with no obvious destination
Under the German administrator Winkler before World War I, a Palauan named Ngirakerisil (Mr. Kerosene) was employed as a canoe operator. Daily he would take the tireless administrator to a different part of Palau to inspect the various economic programs (largely coconut planting) instituted by the now legendary Winkler. The operator, least of all, could predict where they would be going next. The idiom is applied to any aimless person or action; indecision; a changeable person.
> You think only of Present, not of Future.
Chelechang (Present) and Chrechar (Future) were brothers. Present was the favorite of his mother. These are the words of Future reprimanding his mother. The idiom is used of those who inadequately plan for the future.
> Our nose is close (to the mouth), but cannot be licked.
i.e. we shouldn't be too sure of, or overconfident in, ourselves. The nose is very close to the mouth, but, no matter how reassuringly available, it cannot be licked by the tongue. The idiom cautions those who are careless with their possessions to be less assured about wealth.
More Examples:
> Why dont you make us some tea?
> Try your hardest and you won't lose.
> This Ulang just makes a mess and doesn't help clean up.
> Who is not feeling sick?
> I'm not tired.
suebek, v.i.fly (out from).
suebek a sebekreng; suebek a rengul; ng bekikl, ng medakd.
mesebesebek
/mesesebesebek
v.i.redup.fly around aimlessly; float in the wind.
mesebesebek a suebek; charm a mesebesebek.
sobekangv.i.inch.is starting to fly.
sobekang a mocha suebek; skoki a sobekang.
sobekungv.i.pred.is about to fly.
sobekung a mochu suebek; skoki a sobekung.
bekesbesebek a rengulexpr.easily worried; worrisome.
suebek a rengulexpr.worried; anxious.
suebek el charmexpr.bird.
suebek el dialexpr.airplane.
See also: , ,
Examples:
> I am so worried that I cannot speak.
> We sort of became a little bit worried.
> You look really happy or elated.
> I am worried.
> Mothers tend to worry about their children.
Proverbs:
> Like a pigeon-seeing the danger, yet it flies from cover
The pigeon sits quietly concealed until some threat appears, then it flies out, revealing itself. The idiom applies to a person who unnecessarily exposes himself to danger, leaves the house in the rain, or takes a boat out in a storm.
> Like the kingfisher, chattering while taking to wing.
The kingfisher, a restless, bullying bluebird, may be heard to chatter loudly when flying up from the ground or from a perch. The saying applies to one who suddenly spouts instructions to a group, then leaves, or to a leader at a meeting who impatiently interrupts a discussion with a burst of pronouncements, then ends the meeting.
> Like the purple swamp hen, flying off with its legs hanging down
The purple swamp hen (uek; other sources name another bird, sechou [heron]) is careless about its legs when it flies, letting them dangle in flight instead of neatly tucking them up like other, more trim flyers. The saying applies to persons who do sloppy work or carelessly leave a task half finished
> You're a flying kite, but i hold the guide string.
No matter how much you play around, you always come back to me.
> You're like the stork which flies with its legs dangling.
You leave unfinished business behind and split.
More Examples:
> I was close to worrying everyone as I was a little late.

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