diak, v.s.is/are not; does not exist; non-existent.
diak a bechachau; diak a kall, diak a udoud, diak a chad er a blai.
diadiakv.s.redup.
dikeang
/di kea
/di keang
/dikea
v.s.inch.no longer; no more; not... after all.
di keang a mla er ngii e mla mo diak, udoud a di keang.
dimlakv.s.pastwere not; did not exist; was/were non-existent.
dimlak a di mla diak, dimlak le medung er a cheldecheduch, dimlak rengesii, dimlak lemei.
ng diakmod.no.
ngdiakcont.ng diak
diak a rengulexpr.inconsiderate; impolite.
mo diakexpr.run out; stop; disappear; become non-existent.
Examples:
> David convinced his men that they should not attack Saul.
> But those who have faith in that one will never be disappointed.
> If Droteo doesn't go, (then) I won't go.
> I wasted my time going because there was nothing for me to buy.
> Droteo can neither eat nor sleep well any more.
Proverbs:
> Our nose is close (to the mouth), but cannot be licked.
i.e. we shouldn't be too sure of, or overconfident in, ourselves. The nose is very close to the mouth, but, no matter how reassuringly available, it cannot be licked by the tongue. The idiom cautions those who are careless with their possessions to be less assured about wealth.
> Like lightning, a big, unnecessary noise.
Lightning rarely strikes in such a way as to cause serious damage in Palau. May be applied to any unnecessary fuss or oratory at a meeting.
> If it is my lunch it can be divided, if it is yours then it cannot
Two men habitually trapped fish in the same region of the lagoon. One would occasionally ask the other to join him at lunch, the other would always refuse. One day the man who refused arrived with no lunch. When the usual invitation was extended the man refused, saying that, anyway, he had no lunch. The invitation was insistently pressed until the reluctant one gave in. As they split the taro between them the one who shared made the above statement. The idiom is a mild rebuke of a retentive person
> Like the insects which stays at ashes of fire but doesn't burn.
You're near a situation which needs immediate attention but you don't lend a hand.
> It's like the way they eat in Ngeraus (where food is scarce): as soon as they get to like or enjoy the food, it's gone.
Just as something becomes popular, it becomes unavailable. Ngerraus is a small village in Ngchesar (central Palau). The idiom suggests a person who begins to feel hungry just as the food runs out. The reference is to the meager food resources of a small village. In contemporary Palau the idiom may be applied to some popular import that soon disappears from the shelves of the stores.
More Examples:
> The reason is, there are too many crimes in the society.
> No, thank you.
> SDA church people do not eat pork.
> Hey. That knot's no good. The boat will float away.
> My mom doesnt really want me to have a motorcycle.

Search for another word:

WARN mysqli_query error
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('index.php: pe -> dimlak (1)','18.207.132.116','CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')