e, conj.and; (and) then or consequently; (if...,) then; while; but.
e a omechoel; omuchel e omech a bebil er a tekoi, e sechelei, toktang echad er a chei; e ngerang?
engcont.e ng
Examples:
> It is still light out but he feels like going to sleep.
> I can see the child because he behaved well last time.
> Your fine is at least five dollars.
> Get your stuff and let's go.
> At 7:00 a.m. I dress and comb my hair.
Proverbs:
> From the Metkul boundary point at Ngirair, Palau is yet huge up to Ngerechelong.
This saying is given two meanings, both negative, pertaining to the people of northern Palau and to Ngaraard particularly: (i) the people of northern Palau are so provincial that they still think Palau is a huge country; (2) the people of northern Palau are the biggest liars (a play on "to deceive," which sounds like Belau [Palau] ). The idiom may be shortened to "Men of the point" (Chad ra bkul), referring to a point of land at Ngirair marking the boundary of Ngaraard. Or the act of patting the elbow (bkul) may carry the same meaning. Actually, the idiom is of fairly recent vintage, pertaining in part to resistance on the part of some of the people of northern Palau to administrative programs instituted by the Japanese.
> To take a handbag and return.
Applied to a person who "never gets anywhere," a low achiever.
> You're like the bisech plant in the backyard which has no purpose.
A person who isn't trusted so he/she is not needed.
> He's like the chambered nautilus whose shell is very fragile.
When provoked, he gets easily irritated or angered. The Palauan believes that the chambered nautilus lives in the sea at great depth and, at the slightest touch against a rock, its shell is broken and it drifts to the surface where it dies. The saying may be applied to a poor sport, one who angers easily or who reacts badly when the victim of a prank.
> Like Beachedarsai's food, only a little but it does not disappear.
Beachedarsai and a friend, one day, went to heaven. On arrival they were very hungry, so they visited one of the gods who provided food for them. The "food" was one tiny piece of taro and a bit of fish. Beachedarsai thought to himself that this would hardly suffice, but he picked up the taro and ate it. As he did so another piece appeared on the plate. He ate the piece of fish and another piece of fish appeared. His friend also ate and on his plate as well a new piece of taro or fish appeared as each was consumed. When they were satisfied, there remained on their plates a piece of taro and fish. The idiom is applied to any small blessing, such as a small but steady income, or Western meals that, in contrast with the Palauan tray full of food, are served in small portions, and so on.
More Examples:
> She looks so beautiful with her traditional grass skirt and decorations except her lips look inside out with that lipstick.
> Hello,don't trip and take your time.
> She is very fond of me and therefore left everything and came here.
> They got into a fight last night and he was shot in the arm by a fishing gun
> Five villages united and called Kerradel.

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