diak, v.s.is/are not; does not exist; non-existent.
diak a bechachau; diak a kall, diak a udoud, diak a chad er a blai.
diadiakv.s.redup.
dikeang
/di kea
/di keang
/dikea
v.s.inch.no longer; no more; not... after all.
di keang a mla er ngii e mla mo diak, udoud a di keang.
dimlakv.s.pastwere not; did not exist; was/were non-existent.
dimlak a di mla diak, dimlak le medung er a cheldecheduch, dimlak rengesii, dimlak lemei.
ng diakmod.no.
ngdiakcont.ng diak
diak a rengulexpr.inconsiderate; impolite.
mo diakexpr.run out; stop; disappear; become non-existent.
Examples:
> Droteo will definitely come.
> Droteo hardly ever studies.
> You're not allowed to make noise here.
> Her child is trained not to interrupt people.
> The meat is to be roasted and eaten with bitter herbs and with bread made without yeast.
Proverbs:
> Like Beachedarsai's food, only a little but it does not disappear.
Beachedarsai and a friend, one day, went to heaven. On arrival they were very hungry, so they visited one of the gods who provided food for them. The "food" was one tiny piece of taro and a bit of fish. Beachedarsai thought to himself that this would hardly suffice, but he picked up the taro and ate it. As he did so another piece appeared on the plate. He ate the piece of fish and another piece of fish appeared. His friend also ate and on his plate as well a new piece of taro or fish appeared as each was consumed. When they were satisfied, there remained on their plates a piece of taro and fish. The idiom is applied to any small blessing, such as a small but steady income, or Western meals that, in contrast with the Palauan tray full of food, are served in small portions, and so on.
> Like the insects which stays at ashes of fire but doesn't burn.
You're near a situation which needs immediate attention but you don't lend a hand.
> He's like Chelebesoi of Ngeriil, dead in a fishtrap not his own.
A man named Chelebesoi (also the name of a fish) was robbing another man's fish trap when a head-hunting party came by and removed his head. He lost both his head and his reputation. The idiom may apply to one who gets hurt while trying to do someone else's job.
> If it is my lunch it can be divided, if it is yours then it cannot
Two men habitually trapped fish in the same region of the lagoon. One would occasionally ask the other to join him at lunch, the other would always refuse. One day the man who refused arrived with no lunch. When the usual invitation was extended the man refused, saying that, anyway, he had no lunch. The invitation was insistently pressed until the reluctant one gave in. As they split the taro between them the one who shared made the above statement. The idiom is a mild rebuke of a retentive person
> Like the honey bee, celebrating without first boiling down the coconut syrup.
Once coconut syrup, dripping from the cut flower stem, is collected it is thickened by boiling. The honeybee, however, collects his nectar, puts it in the hive without boiling it, then proceeds to fly around noisily as though celebrating the completed task. Hence, to talk or boast loudly about successes and accomplishments when one has none; to make plans but never carry them out; to celebrate without cause.
More Examples:
> We didnt catch anything as the waves were really strong.
> No, so I really have to study tonight.
> My budget was low, I could not buy cigarettes.
> It is weird being married. You're not on your own anymore. It's like something is attached to you all the time.
> He or she is not dressed.

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