kom
/ko
, pro.you (nonemphatic, plural).
ko
a
ko
ko
mo
er
ker
e
ko
mla
Examples:
> Are you already rich?
> Droteo spoke as if he wants to go to the party.
> The prices for watches are pretty low in Hong Kong.
> Why are you doing mischief in you own house?
> Droteo persuaded Maria to finally go to the police.
Proverbs:
> You're like sardines, very many but only enough for one wrapped piece of fish.
Fish are properly wrapped individually in a leaf for cooking, but sardines are so small that a bunch of them may be wrapped together to make up only one small bundle. The idiom may be applied to a numerous but weak enemy or to a clan that is large but ineffective as in raising money for its members, or for a large group of workers who do not accomplish very much.
> He's like the sea urchins between Ngiwal and Melekeok, on the ocean floor with its cover.
The sea urchin can be seen lying quietly on the lagoon floor, occasionally with a leaf like a hat covering its head. Applied to a man who acquires a wife or great wealth without working for it.
> Like an old woman who is cautious about coughing and breaking wind.
Among elderly women, it seems, coughing sometimes produces the unwanted effect of breaking wind. The idiom may be applied to any action that might produce an undesirable side effect, such as a hasty decision at a political meeting. As a caution, it suggests the need for leaders to consider all the consequences.
> It's like eating reboiled (starchy) food.
Cooked taro will spoil in time, unless it is reboiled (blelekl). Among other applications the saying may pertain to a man who marries, separates, then returns to the same woman; also a man who returns to a former job.
> Like the mud fish of the Bngei lagoon, drawn to the passing wind
The reef fish mud seldom leaves a given rock or cleft in the reef, but according to this saying the mud of Bngei lagoon, near Airai, may be attracted away from their locus by the dust raised by a passing school of fish. The latter portion of this proverb is difficult to translate. The word melecheb may be applied to a person drawn forward by a current of water. Rrengor refers to a movement of air caused by one body passing another. The idiom is applied to a changeable person, a faddist, or a joiner
More Examples:
> Do as you say, so everyone can see you are smart as you talk.
> Would you clean them taros as you are closer to them.
> You're like the jellyfish that do not have a destination.
> You are young and idiotic.
> Unruly kids that have twisted the pigeon's neck so it died.

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