di, mod.only; just; any.
di a olkael; di kau a mei e diak a ngodech; di tedei el buik a mong; se di kau, se di ngii.
el di mle ngiiexpr.all by himself; on his own.
ngii di lebongexpr.whatever it is; whatever there may be.
Examples:
> (It turns out that) I'm not going to Guam after all.
> He doesn't want anything but or except a beer.
> No one can explain by himself or herself a prophecy in the Scriptures.
> but there are 450 prophets of Baal.
> The phone number is just the same (as before).
Proverbs:
> Like the clouds of Mengellakl that just pile up
High points like Mengellakl in Palau sometimes create clouds as the moisture-laden air is lifted by the wind to higher cooler altitudes. This saying applies to a situation or a fad that spreads; drinking to excess.
> Like the mud fish of the Bngei lagoon, drawn to the passing wind
The reef fish mud seldom leaves a given rock or cleft in the reef, but according to this saying the mud of Bngei lagoon, near Airai, may be attracted away from their locus by the dust raised by a passing school of fish. The latter portion of this proverb is difficult to translate. The word melecheb may be applied to a person drawn forward by a current of water. Rrengor refers to a movement of air caused by one body passing another. The idiom is applied to a changeable person, a faddist, or a joiner
> Like the blind man of Ngetmel, twisting twine into the fire.
The image is that of a blind elder, warming his frail body beside the fire while twisting strands of fiber into twine against his thigh. Only as he pulls the finished twine away, he pushes it into the flames. The saying may be applied to any utterly pointless activity or dissipation of wealth.
> You think only of Present, not of Future.
Chelechang (Present) and Chrechar (Future) were brothers. Present was the favorite of his mother. These are the words of Future reprimanding his mother. The idiom is used of those who inadequately plan for the future.
> Like the blow at Utaor, one stroke for all
A person or perhaps a club of the hamlet of Utaor (a hamlet of either Koror or Chol) offended a major village and, in consequence, the village retaliated by attacking the whole hamlet. The idiom applies to any general statement or punishment that might better be directed toward a particular group or individual
More Examples:
> Lukes looks really weird because she is just cutting her hair and it's all messed up.
> I think there should be a curfew on land and have flights only come in during the day like before.
> It seems like there is a possibilty of a typhoon.
> I have one younger brother. (Can only be said by a maile).
> Yes, if the weather gets worse, I'll leave.

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