di, mod.only; just; any.
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el di mle ngiiexpr.all by himself; on his own.
ngii di lebongexpr.whatever it is; whatever there may be.
Examples:
> Droteo is so sick that when he tries to lift himself up with his arms, they just bend (in weakness).
> What's keeping you from falling asleep?
> Don't be afraid of your enemies; always be courageous.
> Why are you always hitting the children?
> Why are you always leaving your children behind when you go out?
Proverbs:
> Those of high family are like the seed pod of the bngaol tree, which falls with its leafy cap upright.
The bngaol, a mangrove tree, bears a long pod which is sharply pointed on one end and has a leafy "cap" on the other. When it falls from the tree it generally lands standing in the mud with "cap" end up. Hence, the quality of being socially elite (meteet) is gained naturally at birth. One is born in good standing with a cap or insignia of high rank. It follows, then, that the elite need not display their high standing, everyone knows they are elite when they are born (and there is no other way to become elite). Going a step further, the elite may display proper humility and refer to a group including themselves as kid a remechebuul (we commoners).
> Even though we fix our own betel-nut, we get burned.
Chemachel is a "betelnut package" consisting of the seeded nut, the pepper leaf (kebui), and the lime (chaus). By applying too much lime to a "package" it is possible to burn one's mouth. Although this is sometimes done among young people to signal another secretly of sexual attraction, typically it happens accidentally. The idiom implies that everyone makes mistakes; it can't be helped. No matter how careful we are, we sometimes fail; we shouldn't be too sure or overconfident in ourselves.
> Like the man of Kayangel, who procured his gifts from Keso
The saying refers to a man from the atoll of Kayangel, some twenty miles north of the main islands of Palau, who, on his way south to visit friends, stopped at an intermediate reef, Kesol, to fish for a present for his host. Refers to a person who, en route to a visit, tries to borrow a present from another guest; any person who suddenly wants to borrow money.
> Even a small twig can bring the pot to boil.
From small contributions, great accomplishments; a lot of small twigs can make a hot fire; the virtue of cooperation.
> Like the clouds of Mengellakl that just pile up
High points like Mengellakl in Palau sometimes create clouds as the moisture-laden air is lifted by the wind to higher cooler altitudes. This saying applies to a situation or a fad that spreads; drinking to excess.
More Examples:
> Yes, but I only danced once.
> John, you've poured my drink so full that I will not be able to drink it all.
> Why are Ngerkumer's eyes blinking so much?
> Idiots will always stay idiots until death.
> I only cook the food.

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