di, mod.only; just; any.
di a olkael; di kau a mei e diak a ngodech; di tedei el buik a mong; se di kau, se di ngii.
el di mle ngiiexpr.all by himself; on his own.
ngii di lebongexpr.whatever it is; whatever there may be.
Examples:
> But those who have faith in that one will never be disappointed.
> I came to your house, but you were out.
> Wilbur finished talking and the lambs came out.
> Why don't you sit down (lit., are you standing up because you don't have a bend in your legs)?
> Did you read any a single book today?
Proverbs:
> A male child, though small, is yet like a small barracuda that braces against the flowing stream.
The small barracuda (mersaod, a small ai) can be seen bracing, without apparent motion, against the stream, usually where fresh water flows into the lagoon, or where tide water runs off the reef, until suddenly it dashes into the stream to grab a small fish. Then it retreats once more to its place of watchfulness. This watchful, quiet, reserved, almost crafty approach to life is much admired, and parents will encourage their male children with this saying.
> Like the man of Kayangel, who procured his gifts from Keso
The saying refers to a man from the atoll of Kayangel, some twenty miles north of the main islands of Palau, who, on his way south to visit friends, stopped at an intermediate reef, Kesol, to fish for a present for his host. Refers to a person who, en route to a visit, tries to borrow a present from another guest; any person who suddenly wants to borrow money.
> He's like the rabbit fish in Ngetmeduch, which jumps into the net (seemingly) of its own will.
i.e. He always drops by without having been invited. At one point in their life cycle the meas, a tasty, black reef fish, school close to the surface in the shallow lagoon near Ngetmeduch (Koror) and may be easily caught with the derau, a two-part net consisting of two scoop nets, one held in each hand (hence sometimes "butterfly net"). The idiom is applied to a person who habitually appears without invitation at parties or feasts.
> Our nose is close (to the mouth), but cannot be licked.
i.e. we shouldn't be too sure of, or overconfident in, ourselves. The nose is very close to the mouth, but, no matter how reassuringly available, it cannot be licked by the tongue. The idiom cautions those who are careless with their possessions to be less assured about wealth.
> You're like a floating log without a resting place.
You have no fixed abode.
More Examples:
> No matter where we go, we never stop thinking of our families.
> Government has many redudant job titles with likely the same job duties.
> We are about to run out of meat.
> The boy is hiding in his house because the police are looking for him.
> This old man stayed stiff and contorted as he died.

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