ma, mod.first.
Examples:
> You go on ahead to school, and then I'll follow.
> Due to the weather conditions and increasing hazardous surf, the National Emergency Office (NEMO) is issuing a Small Craft Warning for the entire Republic of Palau. Water conditions from outside the reef through all exposures are very rough at this time. Travel between Peleliu and Angaur, Kayangel and Ollei and/or outside the reefs are strictly prohibited. Small craft warning flags have been raised and the republic is requested to observe this warning. NEMO will continue to monitor these marine conditions and advise the public accordingly.
> The husband and kids are being ignored/neglected because he's so occupied with his work.
me a, conj.and.
macont.me a
makcont.me ak
makicont.me aki
meconj.and.
me a omech a tekoi; kau me ngak me ngii, Calista me tir a mong.
mengcont.me ng
Examples:
> He's so busy playing around that his responsibilities are neglected.
> I was so ashamed I thought I'd die.
> Be firm in your resolve to finish your schooling.
> Let me fix it.
> Go home and sleep.
Proverbs:
> If it is my lunch it can be divided, if it is yours then it cannot
Two men habitually trapped fish in the same region of the lagoon. One would occasionally ask the other to join him at lunch, the other would always refuse. One day the man who refused arrived with no lunch. When the usual invitation was extended the man refused, saying that, anyway, he had no lunch. The invitation was insistently pressed until the reluctant one gave in. As they split the taro between them the one who shared made the above statement. The idiom is a mild rebuke of a retentive person
> The heart and assessment.
This might better be translated, "Assessment with knowledge." The mind or head is thought to be the locus of knowledge in Palau, but such knowledge is made useful or is measured with the heart (reng). Chodab, in this context, would appear to mean "to take stock of" or "to measure." In essence, then, the phrase cautions one who seems on the point of making a rash decision to temper his thoughts with his heart.
> Like Ngiramesemong, rehashing what has been finished.
Pertains to a person who repeatedly reminds another of past favors or continually recalls the mistakes of others. (My sources no longer recalled the episode or story from which this idiom derives.)
> Like seaweed at Kosiil, out with the tide and in with the tide.
Kosiil is a location in the lagoon where the seaweed can be seen to bend in and out with the tide. The idiom is applied to a leader who is too flexible and unreliable. In the short form (Kora char ra Kosiil) it may simply mean, "I'll go along with what you decide."
> Like the man of Kayangel, who procured his gifts from Keso
The saying refers to a man from the atoll of Kayangel, some twenty miles north of the main islands of Palau, who, on his way south to visit friends, stopped at an intermediate reef, Kesol, to fish for a present for his host. Refers to a person who, en route to a visit, tries to borrow a present from another guest; any person who suddenly wants to borrow money.
More Examples:
> Yes, if the weather gets worse, I'll leave.
> My father had always made ropes from coconut husks at the boating house with his friends.
> The ceremony for the birth bath yesterday, the young mother looked really beautiful.
> Why are you frowning all the time?
> The seduction between them both was mutual.

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