mei
/me
, v.i.come; arrive.
mei
a
a
mei
er
mei
me
ka
bev.imp.
be
a
ta
er
a
a
el
er
a
el
be
be
blev.s.hypo.
meracont.mei er a
merekung
/merkung
v.i.pred.is about to come or arrive.
mermang
/meremang
v.inch.
a
er
a
el
er
a
mlei
/mle
v.pastcame; arrived.
a
mla
mei
me
a
er
a

mle
a
er
a
a
mle
ng
mle
mleracont.mlei er a
be kbongexpr.goodbye; I'm leaving.
me e mong
/memong
expr.pass by; go on; "(in a direction) towards me and then keep going (past me)."
nguu el meiexpr.bring.
ta el buil er mla me e mongexpr.one month ago.
Examples:
> It's further in back of me.
> Either Cisco or Tony is coming to my house.
> Why are you so skinny?
> They would weigh more than the sands of the sea, so my wild words should not surprise you.
> What is it that makes you stay away from home so much?
Proverbs:
> Like the man of Kayangel, who procured his gifts from Keso
The saying refers to a man from the atoll of Kayangel, some twenty miles north of the main islands of Palau, who, on his way south to visit friends, stopped at an intermediate reef, Kesol, to fish for a present for his host. Refers to a person who, en route to a visit, tries to borrow a present from another guest; any person who suddenly wants to borrow money.
> Like an old woman who is cautious about coughing and breaking wind.
Among elderly women, it seems, coughing sometimes produces the unwanted effect of breaking wind. The idiom may be applied to any action that might produce an undesirable side effect, such as a hasty decision at a political meeting. As a caution, it suggests the need for leaders to consider all the consequences.
> Like the cockroach of Ngerdobotar, staying on till it became white.
Presumably if a cockroach remains in the darkness for a long time, as one at Ngerdobotar (in Aimeliik) apparently did, it will turn white. Application pertains to a visitor who stays on and on, especially one who is not helpful in the household. Such behavior is not properly human; the person is somehow different, like a white cockroach.
> Like his father, for he ate his father's premasticated food.
Applied to a child by adoption, with the implication that the adopted child resembles his adoptive father
> Like Ngiramesemong, rehashing what has been finished.
Pertains to a person who repeatedly reminds another of past favors or continually recalls the mistakes of others. (My sources no longer recalled the episode or story from which this idiom derives.)
More Examples:
> The crocodile and I had a snatching match for the crab in the channel.
> Do you want to have lunch or dinner sometime?
> My father had always made ropes from coconut husks at the boating house with his friends.
> Who was it that came to the house?
> Don't come outside.
sekkak, v.i., [From Japanese] go to special effort or trouble for; make a point of.
sekkak el meiyou went to all the trouble to come here
Examples:
> I've gone to all this trouble to come and get you, and (now) you don't want (to go).
> Toki made a special effort to fix up her place for a party, but not a single person came.

Search for another word:


Fatal error: Uncaught mysqli_sql_exception: Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist in /home/johnbent/tekinged.com/functions.php:520 Stack trace: #0 /home/johnbent/tekinged.com/functions.php(520): mysqli_query(Object(mysqli), 'INSERT INTO log...') #1 /home/johnbent/tekinged.com/functions.php(1838): visitlog(': pe -> mei (1)') #2 /home/johnbent/tekinged.com/index.php(213): belau_footer(NULL, ': pe -> mei (1)') #3 {main} thrown in /home/johnbent/tekinged.com/functions.php on line 520