mei
/me
, v.i.come; arrive.
mei a okedongel a chad; mei er tiei, mei me kulekoi, ka mei.
bev.imp.be a ta er a telengtengil a tekoi el mengai er a tekoi el mei; be bong, be metengel.
blev.past.hypothetical
meracont.mei er a
merekung
/merkung
v.i.pred.is about to come or arrive.
mermang
/meremang
v.inch.meremang a merael mei; ngar er a omerolel el mei; dumiang er a dmuil.
mlei
/mle
v.pastcame; arrived.
mlei a mla mei me ngar tiang; skoki a mlei er a tutau.
mle a melekoi er a rrekui; Bung a mle tmuu; ng mle mekerang?
mleracont.mlei er a
be kbongexpr.goodbye; I'm leaving.
me e mong
/memong
expr.pass by; go on; "(in a direction) towards me and then keep going (past me)."
nguu el meiexpr.bring.
ta el buil er mla me e mongexpr.one month ago.
Examples:
> The people called the priests and the magicians.
> The wisdom I proclaim is God?s secret wisdom.
> Tomorrow they're coming to my house.
> Elilai and Ltelatk are Bkau and Elibeob's children.
> 20 fish were speared in the head by the skillful fisherman.
Proverbs:
> You grab and then you pick it up.
Like telling a joke, you're still telling it yet you laugh like you just heard it.
> When the purple swamp hen appears, it brings remembrance
There is a song (Oumachas) from which this saying derives: Once there was a young couple who made love in a secluded spot in the taro garden. While they were lying together a purple swamp hen darted out of the brush startling the couple. Eventually love cooled, but thereafter whenever the girl saw a purple swamp hen while she worked in the gardens, she recalled her lover. Hence any occurrence that brings back fond memories.
> Bitter and salty.
The strategy of "doing things the hard way." When alternatives are available, the appropriate choice is the more difficult one. In voice, expression, and action there is a positive accent on personal ability.
> Like the duck of Ngechur, he became industrious after growing old.
The idiom is applied to a person who has more or less vegetated into maturity and old age and who, already far past his prime, suddenly tries without success to do all the things he might have done when younger. It may be used with reference to an elder who tries to be a dandy.
> I build it and you destroy it?
May be applied to a person who feels his aims or projects are being destroyed by the actions of another.
More Examples:
> She was very lost and didn't know what to do.
> Old men had their ears pierced.
> John, you've poured my drink so full that I will not be able to drink it all.
> Come sit for a while.
> The doctor says that I need to heat up my boil so that it can burst and get better.
sekkak, v.i., [From Japanese] go to special effort or trouble for; make a point of.
sekkak el meiyou went to all the trouble to come here
Examples:
> I've gone to all this trouble to come and get you, and (now) you don't want (to go).
> Toki made a special effort to fix up her place for a party, but not a single person came.

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