mei
/me
, v.i.come; arrive.
mei
a
a
mei
er
mei
me
ka
bev.imp.
be
a
ta
er
a
a
el
er
a
el
be
be
blev.past.hypothetical
meracont.mei er a
merekung
/merkung
v.i.pred.is about to come or arrive.
mermang
/meremang
v.inch.
a
er
a
el
er
a
mlei
/mle
v.pastcame; arrived.
a
mla
mei
me
a
er
a

mle
a
er
a
a
mle
ng
mle
mleracont.mlei er a
be kbongexpr.goodbye; I'm leaving.
me e mong
/memong
expr.pass by; go on; "(in a direction) towards me and then keep going (past me)."
nguu el meiexpr.bring.
ta el buil er mla me e mongexpr.one month ago.
Examples:
> Leave it until later.
> The child was awake.
> He's just a child, so don't listen to what he says.
> God has brought me joy and laughter.
> Toki was a teacher.
Proverbs:
> Like Ngiramesemong, rehashing what has been finished.
Pertains to a person who repeatedly reminds another of past favors or continually recalls the mistakes of others. (My sources no longer recalled the episode or story from which this idiom derives.)
> The heart and assessment.
This might better be translated, "Assessment with knowledge." The mind or head is thought to be the locus of knowledge in Palau, but such knowledge is made useful or is measured with the heart (reng). Chodab, in this context, would appear to mean "to take stock of" or "to measure." In essence, then, the phrase cautions one who seems on the point of making a rash decision to temper his thoughts with his heart.
> He's like the sea urchins between Ngiwal and Melekeok, on the ocean floor with its cover.
The sea urchin can be seen lying quietly on the lagoon floor, occasionally with a leaf like a hat covering its head. Applied to a man who acquires a wife or great wealth without working for it.
> It's like the rat of Ngerard, which eats up all your coconuts and (then) all of ours.
It's a decision, plan etc. that will backfire. A pet rat owned by Mad, chief of Ngaraard, ate the coconuts of most of the chief's neighbors, then, still hungry, ate the chief's own coconuts.
> When the purple swamp hen appears, it brings remembrance
There is a song (Oumachas) from which this saying derives: Once there was a young couple who made love in a secluded spot in the taro garden. While they were lying together a purple swamp hen darted out of the brush startling the couple. Eventually love cooled, but thereafter whenever the girl saw a purple swamp hen while she worked in the gardens, she recalled her lover. Hence any occurrence that brings back fond memories.
More Examples:
> The bench is wobbly so we might fall.
> Lets go drink alcohol.
> Why are you making fist, wanna get smacked?
> Because of the love between us we care about each other's well being.
> He thought he could give me the silent treatment so I ignored him.
sekkak, v.i., [From Japanese] go to special effort or trouble for; make a point of.
sekkak el meiyou went to all the trouble to come here
Examples:
> Toki made a special effort to fix up her place for a party, but not a single person came.
> I've gone to all this trouble to come and get you, and (now) you don't want (to go).

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