me a, conj.and.
macont.me a
makcont.me ak
makicont.me aki
meconj.and.
me
a
a
kau
me
me
me
tir
a
mengcont.me ng
Examples:
> Droteo can neither eat nor sleep well any more.
> How did you fall off the dock?
> Why are you acting like a child?
> The weather's getting worse, so let's not go.
> I wanted to come to this island.
Proverbs:
> Like the duck of Ngechur, he became industrious after growing old.
The idiom is applied to a person who has more or less vegetated into maturity and old age and who, already far past his prime, suddenly tries without success to do all the things he might have done when younger. It may be used with reference to an elder who tries to be a dandy.
> Like the man of Kayangel, who procured his gifts from Keso
The saying refers to a man from the atoll of Kayangel, some twenty miles north of the main islands of Palau, who, on his way south to visit friends, stopped at an intermediate reef, Kesol, to fish for a present for his host. Refers to a person who, en route to a visit, tries to borrow a present from another guest; any person who suddenly wants to borrow money.
> Like Ngiramesemong, rehashing what has been finished.
Pertains to a person who repeatedly reminds another of past favors or continually recalls the mistakes of others. (My sources no longer recalled the episode or story from which this idiom derives.)
> Like an old woman who is cautious about coughing and breaking wind.
Among elderly women, it seems, coughing sometimes produces the unwanted effect of breaking wind. The idiom may be applied to any action that might produce an undesirable side effect, such as a hasty decision at a political meeting. As a caution, it suggests the need for leaders to consider all the consequences.
> Without looking afield, it was cut down behind the house.
From the folk tale concerning Mesubed Dingal, the inventor of the Palauan kite (see also No. 73). After his wife had been kidnapped, he constructed a kite using feathers from all the birds of Palau and he needed also wood from an Edebsungel tree to fashion the body of the bird-kite. After looking all over Palau and being on the point of giving up, he found the tree he needed behind his own house. The saying may be applied to anyone who does things the hard way, or who goes far afield to find something which is close at hand.
More Examples:
> I ate rice and beef with vegetables.
> My mother and father love me.
> Palauan language is limited and there are many foreign words being used.
> What can you do in your household that would help relieve your stress?
> The sum of all the money that was collected, I was able to buy my house.
omeng, v.t.put hand over (mouth; nose; etc.); put (mouth; face) against; put (mouth) on opening of bottle; stop up (bottle).
a
a
mla
a
e
mengii
/mengir
v.pf.3s
milengiiv.pf.3s.past
mengv.pf.3p.inan.
a
er
a
me
a
a
a
e
a
milengv.pf.3p.inan.past
bengoelv.a.s.is to be covered with hand; is to be stopped up.
a
el
a
a
a
a
er
a
er
a
el
bleng
/blengoel
v.r.s.covered with hand; stopped up.
a
mla
a
a

a
Examples:
> The attorneys will attempt at a settlement to avoid trial.
> He's bought his car so he's bicycle is now left unused.
> He's so busy playing around that his responsibilities are neglected.
> Ulang weighs so little that she can be blown away by the wind.
> She's an amazing cook that she doesn't even need anyone to try the food she makes.
Proverbs:
> With persistence the village of Ngersuul was maintained
When the men's clubs of Koror could not proceed as far as Melekeiok, a major village to the north that stood in political balance with Koror, the clubs would often stop over at Ngersuul and sack the small village. Yet the people of Ngersuul, over and over defeated, clung to their village and persisted through history. (Sometimes the village of Angaur is used, with a similar meaning, in place of Ngersuul.) The saying may be applied to the harried individual who is about to give up a task because of repeated failure.
> Destroying his money.
Marriage within the clan, generally considered incestuous, limits the value of the food-money exchange, since the materials simply change hands within the same clan group. A man so married is criticized as having destroyed his source of wealth.
More Examples:
> The wind got so strong that it broke down the chicken house / cage.
> I like this child because he's/she's very polite.
> Why are Ngerkumer's eyes blinking so much?
> I fell on the stone path and cracked my head.

Search for another word:

WARN mysqli_query error
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('index.php: pe -> meng (1)','44.192.247.184','CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')