me a, conj.and.
macont.me a
makcont.me ak
makicont.me aki
meconj.and.
me a omech a tekoi; kau me ngak me ngii, Calista me tir a mong.
mengcont.me ng
Examples:
> Then a famine struck all Egypt and Canaan, bringing great suffering.
> Toki's house and Satsko's house burned down.
> On what occasions or at what times did you go to Japan?
> I am going to eat up that apple and those bananas.
> What are you changing your mind?
Proverbs:
> If it is my lunch it can be divided, if it is yours then it cannot
Two men habitually trapped fish in the same region of the lagoon. One would occasionally ask the other to join him at lunch, the other would always refuse. One day the man who refused arrived with no lunch. When the usual invitation was extended the man refused, saying that, anyway, he had no lunch. The invitation was insistently pressed until the reluctant one gave in. As they split the taro between them the one who shared made the above statement. The idiom is a mild rebuke of a retentive person
> He's like the sea urchins between Ngiwal and Melekeok, on the ocean floor with its cover.
The sea urchin can be seen lying quietly on the lagoon floor, occasionally with a leaf like a hat covering its head. Applied to a man who acquires a wife or great wealth without working for it.
> He's like Ngerechebal Island, which is neither closer to Imeliik nor closer to Ngerekebesang.
i.e. He's indecisive or not clearly taking sides. A person who is "on the fence," changeable and indecisive. The saying may also be applied to a partly westernized Palauan.
> It's as if I've submerged my head into Mekaeb (the channel between Peleliu and Agaur).
A term to describe a dish that is really salty.
> Without looking afield, it was cut down behind the house.
From the folk tale concerning Mesubed Dingal, the inventor of the Palauan kite (see also No. 73). After his wife had been kidnapped, he constructed a kite using feathers from all the birds of Palau and he needed also wood from an Edebsungel tree to fashion the body of the bird-kite. After looking all over Palau and being on the point of giving up, he found the tree he needed behind his own house. The saying may be applied to anyone who does things the hard way, or who goes far afield to find something which is close at hand.
More Examples:
> Dont mess with the spotted eagle ray when you go fishing as they are sacred.
> Is that your dream or did it really happen?
> I ate cassava and Japanese noodles soup.
> That kid drools so much that his shirt is always wet.
> The crocodile and I had a snatching match for the crab in the channel.
omeng, v.t.put hand over (mouth; nose; etc.); put (mouth; face) against; put (mouth) on opening of bottle; stop up (bottle).
omeng a mengir; dokedekii, mertii, toktang a mla meng a ngerir e omodk, bengel.
mengii
/mengir
v.pf.3s
milengiiv.pf.3s.past
mengv.pf.3p.inan.meng a omeng; melekedek er a ngerel me a isngel; toktang a mengir a ngerel e omodk; bleng; blengoel, bengel a ngor.
milengv.pf.3p.inan.past
bengoelv.a.s.is to be covered with hand; is to be stopped up.
bengoel a kirel el obeng; mekngit a secherel a bengoel a ngerel, omeng a er a isngel er a mekngit el bau.
bleng
/blengoel
v.r.s.covered with hand; stopped up.
bleng a mla obeng, metenget; telenget, mengir a ngerel, bleng a telil.
blengoel a bleng.
Examples:
> The attorneys will attempt at a settlement to avoid trial.
> It's as if I live somewhere so far away that I don't know what's going on.
> He's so busy playing around that his responsibilities are neglected.
> He's bought his car so he's bicycle is now left unused.
> She's an amazing cook that she doesn't even need anyone to try the food she makes.
Proverbs:
> Destroying his money.
Marriage within the clan, generally considered incestuous, limits the value of the food-money exchange, since the materials simply change hands within the same clan group. A man so married is criticized as having destroyed his source of wealth.
> With persistence the village of Ngersuul was maintained
When the men's clubs of Koror could not proceed as far as Melekeiok, a major village to the north that stood in political balance with Koror, the clubs would often stop over at Ngersuul and sack the small village. Yet the people of Ngersuul, over and over defeated, clung to their village and persisted through history. (Sometimes the village of Angaur is used, with a similar meaning, in place of Ngersuul.) The saying may be applied to the harried individual who is about to give up a task because of repeated failure.
More Examples:
> Why are Ngerkumer's eyes blinking so much?
> I fell on the stone path and cracked my head.

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