mei
/me
, v.i.come; arrive.
mei a okedongel a chad; mei er tiei, mei me kulekoi, ka mei.
bev.imp.be a ta er a telengtengil a tekoi el mengai er a tekoi el mei; be bong, be metengel.
blev.past.hypothetical
meracont.mei er a
merekung
/merkung
v.i.pred.is about to come or arrive.
mermang
/meremang
v.inch.meremang a merael mei; ngar er a omerolel el mei; dumiang er a dmuil.
mlei
/mle
v.pastcame; arrived.
mlei a mla mei me ngar tiang; skoki a mlei er a tutau.
mle a melekoi er a rrekui; Bung a mle tmuu; ng mle mekerang?
mleracont.mlei er a
be kbongexpr.goodbye; I'm leaving.
me e mongexpr.pass by; go on; "(in a direction) towards me and then keep going (past me)."
nguu el meiexpr.bring.
ta el buil er mla me e mongexpr.one month ago.
Examples:
> When are you coming?
> My trip to Japan was great.
> The picture was drawn in five minutes.
> I was so embarrassed I thought I'd die.
> Move a little closer.
Proverbs:
> He's like Ngerechebal Island, which is neither closer to Imeliik nor closer to Ngerekebesang.
i.e. He's indecisive or not clearly taking sides. A person who is "on the fence," changeable and indecisive. The saying may also be applied to a partly westernized Palauan.
> The heart and assessment.
This might better be translated, "Assessment with knowledge." The mind or head is thought to be the locus of knowledge in Palau, but such knowledge is made useful or is measured with the heart (reng). Chodab, in this context, would appear to mean "to take stock of" or "to measure." In essence, then, the phrase cautions one who seems on the point of making a rash decision to temper his thoughts with his heart.
> You're like a fish bait which can be eaten or pecked from the top and bottom.
You don't know what to do coz chores keep coming in from left and right.
> If it is my lunch it can be divided, if it is yours then it cannot
Two men habitually trapped fish in the same region of the lagoon. One would occasionally ask the other to join him at lunch, the other would always refuse. One day the man who refused arrived with no lunch. When the usual invitation was extended the man refused, saying that, anyway, he had no lunch. The invitation was insistently pressed until the reluctant one gave in. As they split the taro between them the one who shared made the above statement. The idiom is a mild rebuke of a retentive person
> Like his father, for he ate his father's premasticated food.
Applied to a child by adoption, with the implication that the adopted child resembles his adoptive father
More Examples:
> Why are you frowning all the time?
> John, forgive me, I made a stop at Ngerkumer's and may be a run a little late.
> John, you've poured my drink so full that I will not be able to drink it all.
> The Palauan language has its own grammar and pronounciation.
> Because of the love between us we care about each other's well being.

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