mong, v.i.go (in a direction not towards either the speaker or listener).
mong a merael mo cheroid; skuul a ngar a mong.
Bong!v.imp.Go! Go ahead!.
bocha
/bochang
v.inch.hypo.may become.
bochung
/bochu
v.hypotheticalis about to go.
bongv.hypothetical
mlongv.pastwent.
mlong a mla mong; mlo er a skuul.
mochang
/mocha
v.inch.is beginning to arrive; is just arriving.
mochang a omerolel el mong; locha mochang.
mochung
/mochu
v.pred.is about to go.
mochung a kmeed el mong; ke mochung? ak mochung.
el moexpr.until.
el mo el mongexpr.(do something) in a continuous fashion; go on or keep on (doing something).
ng mochu er ngiiexpr.there is about to be.
nguu el mongexpr.take.
Examples:
> The Lord made the king stubborn.
> You don't want to go to the movies, and you don't even want to go to the restaurant, so what do you really want to do?
> I've given Droteo freedom (from earlier restrictions), so he can go to the movies.
> On another occasion the Lord was angry with Israel.
> He will do the same to everyone else whose land you invade.
Proverbs:
> Like the clouds of Mengellakl that just pile up
High points like Mengellakl in Palau sometimes create clouds as the moisture-laden air is lifted by the wind to higher cooler altitudes. This saying applies to a situation or a fad that spreads; drinking to excess.
> Like coconut water, passing from darkness to darkness.
Water, drunk from a coconut, passes from the dark of the nut to the dark of the mouth. Some discussions, such as those of village leaders, are secretively passed from mouth to mouth without public discussion.
> Like the people of Ngerechelong, standing together on the base of the coconut tree.
The mound or hump that forms at the base of the coconut tree is said to represent the highest ranking village clan. The leader of that clan is spoken of as "standing on the mound." In the idiom, it is suggested that the people of Ngerechelong (northern Palau) would all like to be leaders-all standing on the mound at the same time. The idiom may be applied where too many people try to direct an operation; too many leaders.
> From the Metkul boundary point at Ngirair, Palau is yet huge up to Ngerechelong.
This saying is given two meanings, both negative, pertaining to the people of northern Palau and to Ngaraard particularly: (i) the people of northern Palau are so provincial that they still think Palau is a huge country; (2) the people of northern Palau are the biggest liars (a play on "to deceive," which sounds like Belau [Palau] ). The idiom may be shortened to "Men of the point" (Chad ra bkul), referring to a point of land at Ngirair marking the boundary of Ngaraard. Or the act of patting the elbow (bkul) may carry the same meaning. Actually, the idiom is of fairly recent vintage, pertaining in part to resistance on the part of some of the people of northern Palau to administrative programs instituted by the Japanese.
More Examples:
> You visit Koror frequently so at least visit your relatives.
> Wait for the water to boil and then put in the tapioca.
> Idiots will always stay idiots until death.
> It's getting dark and the sun is setting.
> Look at where you came from let alone your household before you try to wise up a stranger.

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