er, prep.indicates specific (as opposed to non-specific) object noun phrase in certain constructions [similar to how 'the' is different from 'a']; used to precede the object of locational, directional, source, temporal, and causal phrases.
er
a
a
a
e
el
er
a
ak
er
a
eracont.er a
racont.er a
Examples:
> The Benjaminites had already killed the thirty Israelites.
> (It turned out that) Droteo didn't go to the movies after all.
> The weather looks as if it might be good tomorrow.
> This forgetfulness of yours is very bad.
> I wasted my time going because there was nothing for me to buy.
Proverbs:
> Even though we fix our own betel-nut, we get burned.
Chemachel is a "betelnut package" consisting of the seeded nut, the pepper leaf (kebui), and the lime (chaus). By applying too much lime to a "package" it is possible to burn one's mouth. Although this is sometimes done among young people to signal another secretly of sexual attraction, typically it happens accidentally. The idiom implies that everyone makes mistakes; it can't be helped. No matter how careful we are, we sometimes fail; we shouldn't be too sure or overconfident in ourselves.
> He's like the chambered nautilus whose shell is very fragile.
When provoked, he gets easily irritated or angered. The Palauan believes that the chambered nautilus lives in the sea at great depth and, at the slightest touch against a rock, its shell is broken and it drifts to the surface where it dies. The saying may be applied to a poor sport, one who angers easily or who reacts badly when the victim of a prank.
> Puffed out like a puffer fish.
A boastful person is like a puffer fish, full of air and not edible, hence not worthy of note.
> It's like taking a shower at Tellei's bath, when somebody takes a shower, you shiver from the cold.
Someone's actions makes you embarrassed.
> Like a pigeon-seeing the danger, yet it flies from cover
The pigeon sits quietly concealed until some threat appears, then it flies out, revealing itself. The idiom applies to a person who unnecessarily exposes himself to danger, leaves the house in the rain, or takes a boat out in a storm.
More Examples:
> My mother in law is a bit under the weather.
> Put the breadfruit in the pot.
> The weather here is very bad.
> My baby is teething and drooling so much that my shirt is now wet from the drool.
> I am the good Shepherd. The good Shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.

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