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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blerek, v.r.s.spread; stretched out; propagated.
blerek a mla oberek; berrokel, omerek a babier, merekii, merek a chais, berekel.
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bliongel, v.r.s.divided; distributed; separated; separate.
bliongel a blii; mla obii, bliongel er a kall, blingelel a udoud, rusel, bingel.
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klekar, v.r.s.watched over; guarded; watchful (of one's behavior).
klekar a mengkar; bulis a klekar er a kelebus; omes e omtebechel er ngii; kokerengii, kokar, kekerengel.
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ngelsakl, v.r.s.divided; separated; (wood) removed from fire; moved out of the way.
ngelsakl a chacheroid; diak lulturek; idungel a ngelsakl me a ngau a ulekoad; ngoseklii, ngosakl, ngeseklel.
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nglukl, v.r.s.transported; moved; hit; smashed into or against.
nglukl a mla mengukl; nglai el mo er a kuk ngodech; blai a nglukl el mo er a cheroid; nguklii; ngklel.
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uldak, v.r.s.added together; unified; joined.
uldak a diak le kakerous; udoud a dmak; uldak er a chimo el chidib, odak, odekial.
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uldum, v.r.s.made to appear.
uldum a mla modum; ulecholt, ngalek a uldum a bdelul er a daob; mla tmoech; odmii, odum, sils a uldum; odmil.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chertemall, v.a.s.is to have a sticky substance applied.
chertemall a kirel el mecheritem; chirtemii er a kar; chiritem, mengilt.
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chesmall, v.a.s.is to be tapped or rapped on; is to be rung.
chesmall a kirel el mechosm; chesmoll, chosmii, chuosm a kambalang, mengosm, chesmel.
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odibsebsall, v.a.s.is to be filled to overflowing; is to be poured out.
odibsebsall a kirel el mokeek; mo mui; odibsebsii a ralm er a ngeliokl; subsii; odibsebsel.
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okdengerechall, v.a.s.is to be placed or set rightside up; is to be turned face up.
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okerngall, v.a.s.is to be awakened.
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terebengall, v.a.s.is to be turned face or top down; is to be stopped.
terebengall a omosech; kirel el meterob; torebengii a omerael; torob a osisebel a mekngit el kar; terebengel.
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ukeruul, v.a.s.is to be given medicine; (fish) is to be salted.
ukeruul a kirel el mukar; omkar; osbitar a blil a ukeruul el omkar a secher; toktang a omkar a secher.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
rirfallen leaves of kebui.merirthe color yellow.
olechutellarge bamboo raftolechutellarge bamboo raft
chelechelouldandruff.chelechelouldandruff.
chadliver.chedengaolsick with jaundice.
kerdikyaws; framboesia.kerdikyaws; framboesia.
bisechwild taro (makes mouth itchy).bisechwild taro (makes mouth itchy).
ngikelfish.bekengikelsmell of fish.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
kngtil a rengul(someone's) being mean or feeling sad or frustrated.
titmekl a rengultimid; scared.
mechitechut a rengulweak willed; unmotivated; easily discouraged.
moalech a renguldisappointed; dismayed.
delbeseaol a rengulaimless; idle; foolish.
bltkil a rengulone's affection/concern for.
dmolech a rengulwise; prudent; careful in planning ahead.

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