aika
/aikang
, pro.these objects/animals near speaker and near listener.
aikalcont.aika el
aika el hongexpr.these books.
Examples:
> The amount of money has become more than the cost of the house.
> I'm doing these things for you (pl.) benefit.
> In the past 6 months have rats eaten your plants?
> You're talking too much (about me)./I don't want to hear anymore.
> There's gotten to be too much food for us.
Proverbs:
> This liver is shark.
A blind man lived with his wife and son at Ngetmel (in Ngerechelong, northern Palau). Since he was blind, his wife and son would often fool him. For one thing, she would leave him in charge of their prize piece of money, indicating its hiding place, when she left for work in the gardens. But before she left she would hide it in another place. One day when he was alone, his brother came to visit and to help around the house. The blind man asked him to gather some wood for a fire so he could warm himself. The brother did so and left. While the man warmed himself, he found, to his surprise, that he could see a little. The following day, with his improved sight, he found out about the money deception and located the real hiding place of the money. Once more his brother visited, and the blind man asked what wood he had used in the fire. The wood was driftwood and he had his brother build another fire. Again his sight improved and he was so pleased that he invited his brother to stay and help himself to some ray-fish liver. The brother looked at the liver and told the man that it was not ray-fish but shark liver. With this the man realized that he had really been deceived, for shark's liver is hardly considered worth eating. Hurt and angered, he told his brother to find the piece of money, pointing out its actual location, and gave it to his brother, saying his wife and son deserved nothing. When the wife came home she at once looked for the money. Unable to find it, she asked her supposedly blind husband about it and, of course, he insisted that she would find it in the place she had pointed out to him, since he had not touched it. Finally she gave up the search and exclaimed: "It simply isn't here." To this he replied: "This liver is shark." The saying may be used when one has discovered another's deception or when a person faces a very frustrating or defeating situation.
More Examples:
> Do you want to take some of these food home when you leave?
> I'm smirking at the people working for the government, do they think they own these government vehicles when they're behind the wheels.
> The ships that were burned is a message to the world not to mess with Belau.
> You saw those yesterday.
> We can say they're like sardines without heads in a can.
chad, n.liver.
a
ta
er
a
a
a
a
chedengaln.poss.3schedengal a chad; chedengal a babii, chedengal a rrull.
Aika chedengal (a matukeoll)!interj.
a
See
in
for
chedengaolv.s.have a large liver.
a
a
el
chedengaolv.s.sick with jaundice.
a
a
Examples:
> Steven is helping those people.
> One hundred people voted.
> Quit pity crying (about someone) or you'll kill that person. (There is a superstition that pity crying about someone can result in their death).
> No one is to come here./No trespassing.
> Anyone who doesn't know how to swim will drown.
Proverbs:
> This liver is shark.
A blind man lived with his wife and son at Ngetmel (in Ngerechelong, northern Palau). Since he was blind, his wife and son would often fool him. For one thing, she would leave him in charge of their prize piece of money, indicating its hiding place, when she left for work in the gardens. But before she left she would hide it in another place. One day when he was alone, his brother came to visit and to help around the house. The blind man asked him to gather some wood for a fire so he could warm himself. The brother did so and left. While the man warmed himself, he found, to his surprise, that he could see a little. The following day, with his improved sight, he found out about the money deception and located the real hiding place of the money. Once more his brother visited, and the blind man asked what wood he had used in the fire. The wood was driftwood and he had his brother build another fire. Again his sight improved and he was so pleased that he invited his brother to stay and help himself to some ray-fish liver. The brother looked at the liver and told the man that it was not ray-fish but shark liver. With this the man realized that he had really been deceived, for shark's liver is hardly considered worth eating. Hurt and angered, he told his brother to find the piece of money, pointing out its actual location, and gave it to his brother, saying his wife and son deserved nothing. When the wife came home she at once looked for the money. Unable to find it, she asked her supposedly blind husband about it and, of course, he insisted that she would find it in the place she had pointed out to him, since he had not touched it. Finally she gave up the search and exclaimed: "It simply isn't here." To this he replied: "This liver is shark." The saying may be used when one has discovered another's deception or when a person faces a very frustrating or defeating situation.
> Like the man of Kayangel, who procured his gifts from Keso
The saying refers to a man from the atoll of Kayangel, some twenty miles north of the main islands of Palau, who, on his way south to visit friends, stopped at an intermediate reef, Kesol, to fish for a present for his host. Refers to a person who, en route to a visit, tries to borrow a present from another guest; any person who suddenly wants to borrow money.
> The light of youth is darkness.
A young person may display pride or may be showy in dress habits; youth may shine, but the brilliance does not mean enlightenment.
> A man whose breechcloth is closed
A well-organized man, particularly one who uses his money carefully; hence, sometimes, a stingy person.
> Like a man circumcised, insufficient skin.
Circumcision seems to have been known in Palau prior to contact, perhaps through contact with the Philippines, but was not widely practiced. As in this context, it usually draws attention in the form of ridicule. The idiom applies to any circumstance in which there has been insufficient preparation or planning; a premature decision.
More Examples:
> This person is harvesting fruits.
> When is his/her funeral?
> The job of a cook is to make the food.
> The first floor contained a guard room, recreation room, hallway, workers room, and an NCO room.
> Who is the fastest runner at this school?

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