dui, n.title (for village chief or family head).
dui
a
a
a
a
er
a
a
kuk
a
oba
diakn.poss.1s
diamn.poss.2s
dialn.poss.3s
a
dui
el
a
er
ng
el
a
dimamn.poss.1pe
diadn.poss.1pi
dimiun.poss.2p
dirirn.poss.3p
meluchel er a duiexpr.hold title.
Examples:
> Do you want to come with me or not?
> His family and the villagers were quite surprised at the boy's sudden good health and quick recovery.
> But those who have faith in that one will never be disappointed.
> You have a lot of nerve.
> Don't you have any cigarettes?
Proverbs:
> Like the honey bee, celebrating without first boiling down the coconut syrup.
Once coconut syrup, dripping from the cut flower stem, is collected it is thickened by boiling. The honeybee, however, collects his nectar, puts it in the hive without boiling it, then proceeds to fly around noisily as though celebrating the completed task. Hence, to talk or boast loudly about successes and accomplishments when one has none; to make plans but never carry them out; to celebrate without cause.
> An ukall tree won't become a titimel tree.
i.e., a child will resemble its father; human nature will not change. The ukal, a lumber tree, resembles the titiml, a fruit bearing tree, at least to the extent that both are trees and become quite large. Both have assets but are quite different. The idiom is applied in the sense that a child resembles its father and will become what its father was. It may also be used to mean "human nature can't be changed."
> Water is without cost.
Palauans bathe frequently; many will not miss a daily bath if at all possible. Bathing places are usually widened areas, natural or artificial (some elaborately paved with stone) in fresh-water streams. The phrase simply reminds another, probably a reluctant child, that he should bathe.
> Like Kerosene, poling his canoe with no obvious destination
Under the German administrator Winkler before World War I, a Palauan named Ngirakerisil (Mr. Kerosene) was employed as a canoe operator. Daily he would take the tireless administrator to a different part of Palau to inspect the various economic programs (largely coconut planting) instituted by the now legendary Winkler. The operator, least of all, could predict where they would be going next. The idiom is applied to any aimless person or action; indecision; a changeable person.
> If it is my lunch it can be divided, if it is yours then it cannot
Two men habitually trapped fish in the same region of the lagoon. One would occasionally ask the other to join him at lunch, the other would always refuse. One day the man who refused arrived with no lunch. When the usual invitation was extended the man refused, saying that, anyway, he had no lunch. The invitation was insistently pressed until the reluctant one gave in. As they split the taro between them the one who shared made the above statement. The idiom is a mild rebuke of a retentive person
More Examples:
> What was said this morning will stay as is until we resume tomorrow.
> It's the object used when a man and a woman go to bed together whose purpose is to prevent pregnancy and to prevent the transmission of disease between them.
> Go check the rambutan in the rain forest. If there are ripe ones, bring them home but make sure to hide them so people don't bum them off you.
> No, I'm going to school tomorrow.
> No, I can't help you.
suebek, v.i.fly (out from).
a
a
ng
ng
mesebesebek
/mesesebesebek
v.i.redup.fly around aimlessly; float in the wind.
a
a
sobekangv.i.inch.is starting to fly.
a
a
sobekungv.i.pred.is about to fly.
a
a
bekesbesebek a rengulexpr.easily worried; worrisome.
suebek a rengulexpr.worried; anxious.
suebek el charmexpr.bird.
suebek el dialexpr.airplane.
See also: , ,
Examples:
> Ulang weighs so little that she can be blown away by the wind.
> You look really happy or elated.
> We sort of became a little bit worried.
> I would fly away and find rest.
> Mothers tend to worry about their children.
Proverbs:
> Like the purple swamp hen, flying off with its legs hanging down
The purple swamp hen (uek; other sources name another bird, sechou [heron]) is careless about its legs when it flies, letting them dangle in flight instead of neatly tucking them up like other, more trim flyers. The saying applies to persons who do sloppy work or carelessly leave a task half finished
> You're a flying kite, but i hold the guide string.
No matter how much you play around, you always come back to me.
> Like the kingfisher, chattering while taking to wing.
The kingfisher, a restless, bullying bluebird, may be heard to chatter loudly when flying up from the ground or from a perch. The saying applies to one who suddenly spouts instructions to a group, then leaves, or to a leader at a meeting who impatiently interrupts a discussion with a burst of pronouncements, then ends the meeting.
> Like a pigeon-seeing the danger, yet it flies from cover
The pigeon sits quietly concealed until some threat appears, then it flies out, revealing itself. The idiom applies to a person who unnecessarily exposes himself to danger, leaves the house in the rain, or takes a boat out in a storm.
> You're like the stork which flies with its legs dangling.
You leave unfinished business behind and split.
More Examples:
> I was close to worrying everyone as I was a little late.

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