diak, v.s.is/are not; does not exist; non-existent.
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diadiakv.s.redup.
dikeang
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v.s.inch.no longer; no more; not... after all.
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dimlakv.s.pastwere not; did not exist; was/were non-existent.
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ng diakmod.no.
ngdiakcont.ng diak
diak a rengulexpr.inconsiderate; impolite.
mo diakexpr.run out; stop; disappear; become non-existent.
Examples:
> Toki's party was just getting interesting when it ended.
> Droteo neither ate nor drank and just left.
> The old man lost his job.
> I won't fail to kill you (one of these days).
> Nothing makes Droteo give up what he's doing.
Proverbs:
> Like Kerosene, poling his canoe with no obvious destination
Under the German administrator Winkler before World War I, a Palauan named Ngirakerisil (Mr. Kerosene) was employed as a canoe operator. Daily he would take the tireless administrator to a different part of Palau to inspect the various economic programs (largely coconut planting) instituted by the now legendary Winkler. The operator, least of all, could predict where they would be going next. The idiom is applied to any aimless person or action; indecision; a changeable person.
> One for whom the door of words was not closed.
When the secrets of a clan or a profession were being taught by an expert, the house was completely closed and instruction took place in strict, whispered secrecy. the idiom may be applied to a person who, while having the proper status to be knowledgeable, has never learned in closed session; an important but uninformed person. Conversely, an expert or knowledgeable clan his torian is one who "has had the door closed" (mleng a simer).
> It's like the foam of the sea, which forms unexpectedly and then disappears.
It's a matter that comes up for lengthy discussions and then is dropped without resolution or effect. Some things, like sea foam, drift on without settlement. Endless discussion without reaching agreement.
> If it is my lunch it can be divided, if it is yours then it cannot
Two men habitually trapped fish in the same region of the lagoon. One would occasionally ask the other to join him at lunch, the other would always refuse. One day the man who refused arrived with no lunch. When the usual invitation was extended the man refused, saying that, anyway, he had no lunch. The invitation was insistently pressed until the reluctant one gave in. As they split the taro between them the one who shared made the above statement. The idiom is a mild rebuke of a retentive person
> Like the Bilimbi tree which, if not shaken, will not bear fruit.
Applied to a person who does not fulfill their obligations without constant prodding or nagging.
More Examples:
> My budget was low, I could not buy cigarettes.
> It's the object used when a man and a woman go to bed together whose purpose is to prevent pregnancy and to prevent the transmission of disease between them.
> We can say they're like sardines without heads in a can.
> I really don't like Arizona state because of the heat.
> Excluding Ulang seems excessive.

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