er, prep.indicates specific (as opposed to non-specific) object noun phrase in certain constructions [similar to how 'the' is different from 'a']; used to precede the object of locational, directional, source, temporal, and causal phrases.
er
a
a
a
e
el
er
a
ak
er
a
eracont.er a
racont.er a
Examples:
> I was with Toki yesterday.
> They will be like trees whose branches are burned by fire, whose blossoms are blown away by the wind.
> If the tide is good, (then) they'll go fishing.
> I wasted my time going because there was nothing for me to buy.
> This is the dialect from Ngerard.
Proverbs:
> Like the cockroach of Ngerdobotar, staying on till it became white.
Presumably if a cockroach remains in the darkness for a long time, as one at Ngerdobotar (in Aimeliik) apparently did, it will turn white. Application pertains to a visitor who stays on and on, especially one who is not helpful in the household. Such behavior is not properly human; the person is somehow different, like a white cockroach.
> It's like the rat of Ngerard, which eats up all your coconuts and (then) all of ours.
It's a decision, plan etc. that will backfire. A pet rat owned by Mad, chief of Ngaraard, ate the coconuts of most of the chief's neighbors, then, still hungry, ate the chief's own coconuts.
> From the Metkul boundary point at Ngirair, Palau is yet huge up to Ngerechelong.
This saying is given two meanings, both negative, pertaining to the people of northern Palau and to Ngaraard particularly: (i) the people of northern Palau are so provincial that they still think Palau is a huge country; (2) the people of northern Palau are the biggest liars (a play on "to deceive," which sounds like Belau [Palau] ). The idiom may be shortened to "Men of the point" (Chad ra bkul), referring to a point of land at Ngirair marking the boundary of Ngaraard. Or the act of patting the elbow (bkul) may carry the same meaning. Actually, the idiom is of fairly recent vintage, pertaining in part to resistance on the part of some of the people of northern Palau to administrative programs instituted by the Japanese.
> I build it and you destroy it?
May be applied to a person who feels his aims or projects are being destroyed by the actions of another.
> It's like the birth of a rat with one offspring per mother.
It's something that happens just once, something I put up with only once. According to this saying, the rat bears but one litter. Hence the application "once is enough" about an act that bears no repeating.
More Examples:
> Who is the best swimmer at this school?
> When we were kids in school, we used to cut the grass and do general clean up at school.
> Actions speak more than words.
> There are 6 tables and 8 chairs.
> Go and bring my basket so we can go to the taro patch.

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